Mike Bowers, Reflections on Georgia Politics


BOB SHORT: Hello. I’m Bob Short, and this is Reflections on
Georgia Politics sponsored by Young Harris College and the Richard Russell Library at
the University of Georgia. We are delighted today to have as our guest
Mike Bowers, former Attorney General, candidate for governor, and now a very successful Atlanta
attorney. Mike, welcome. MIKE BOWERS: Thanks very much, Bob. I’m honored that you would ask to speak with
me. SHORT: Well, you’re the one of the career
great people in Georgia politics, and we’re very happy to be able to talk to you. Now, before we get into your career as Attorney
General, tell us a little bit about Mike Bowers and his early life. BOWERS: I was born in a farmhouse near Commerce,
Georgia. I currently live two miles from that farmhouse,
and I pass it every time I go home. I grew up though in the Atlanta area, out
east of this office in Little Five Points. My mother and dad moved there right at the
beginning of World War II. My dad was a bus driver for Greyhound. We lived in an apartment house there, an old
house that had been broke into apartments; went to elementary school in Little Five Points,
a year of high school there. And then finally mother and dad got together
enough money to buy their first house in 1956, and we moved to DeKalb County. And I went to high school out there, Southwest
DeKalb. When I graduated, I went to West Point, spent
four years there, seven years in the Air Force. Came back, went to Georgia Law School, and
then went to work in the Attorney General’s office. SHORT: How did it happen that you chose a
career in public service rather than joining a law firm? BOWERS: It was probably more by accident than
anything, Bob. When I graduated from law school in 1973 — I
finished in ’73, though I was the class of ’74 — the State Attorney General’s office
was well known for being a place to get experience. Plus at that time it paid within $1,000 a
year of what King & Spalding paid. So it wasn’t a real hard choice to make. It was a good jot that paid well, and it was
the best place in the world to get experience. Plus I was a little older, from having been
in the Service for several years, and I wanted to catch up as quickly as possible. SHORT: Arthur Bolton was the Attorney General
at that time? BOWERS: That’s correct. He’s a great man. SHORT: What did you do on Mr. Bolton’s staff? BOWERS: Whatever he told me. And the nice thing about working for Arthur
Bolton was he always told you to do what was right. And he was truly a student of the law and
a student of government and politics, and he tried to make the state law department
or Attorney General’s office a professional law office. One of the conditions that he took the office
from Carl Sanders, so he told us quite frequently — was that he’d be independent, be allowed
to hire and fire whoever worked there, and be the sole legal advisor of the executive
branch of government. So it was a great place to work. Mr. Bolton was a wonderful human being for
whom to work. And of the handful of people that have most
influenced me professionally in life and personally, Arthur Bolton is one of those people. I will never ever forget him. Along with some other folks, I started a scholarship
or a professorship at the law school in his honor, and I’m going to see that that’s funded
if I live long enough. SHORT: In 1951 you were appointed Attorney
General by George Busbee. We know that when a vacancy in an office like
that occurs, the governor has many friends and many friends of friends who call on him
to make that appointment. How do you think that he decided to appoint
you? BOWERS: I think it was probably two things. I don’t know for sure, and I never talked
to Governor Busbee about it. I am forever in his debt, and nobody could
have been better to me than George Dekle Busbee. He was a wonderful man, and I revere his memory. Prior to my appointment, there had been a
big raucous over the resignation from the Supreme Court of Jesse Bowles and the appointment
of Hardy Gregory. And it was�just involved all kinds of lawsuits
in state and federal court. And Governor Busbee took an unusual interest
in those and actually attended — I think it was the federal trial, sat at counsel table. And I was trying those cases, so we got to
know each other fairly well. And then Mr. Bolton — the second reason was
Mr. Bolton recommended me to him and did so in his typical very strong fashion. And I guess that’s why I got appointed. But it was obviously for me an enormous break
professionally in life to get that appointment. And it was a great job. It was a great lawyer’s job, my goodness. You can’t ask for — it was exciting; it was
interesting, and now and then you got to do things that really helped people. SHORT: But if you will, for those who might
not know, please tell us the duties of the Attorney General in the state of Georgia. BOWERS: Well, basically three functions: The
first and most important was to ensure that all of the agencies in the executive branch
of government — and that’s all of state government except the legislature and the court system
— that that part of government had legal representation for advice, for going to court,
or what have you. That was one function. The second function was to conduct certain
prosecutions, usually involving corruption within state government, like the Sam Caldwell
prosecution that occurred right after I took office, the old labor department commissioner. And then the third function was to represent
the State of Georgia when death row inmates appealed their sentences. That took up a good bit of time and effort,
although it was a small number of cases. Those are the three biggest things. SHORT: You have spoken out in the past in
favor of the death penalty. Do you feel still that the death penalty is
a good sentence? BOWERS: I think it is a necessary sentence,
Bob. My views have changed some over the years. Maybe it’s just the process of getting older. I have represented a death row inmate now
that I’ve been in private practice. I still favor the death penalty for one reason
above all others: There’s simply no other penalty in some cases that is appropriate
for the crime that’s been committed. I do not believe that the death penalty is
a deterrent. I don’t think it’s going to reduce crime. It’s just that for some crimes there’s nothing
else that society can do that is appropriate in that case. Some of these torture cases, some of these
cases where there are multiple murders, there’s just nothing else appropriate. And that was a good part of both the political
and legal involvement of the Attorney General while I was in office. SHORT: The new trend as I see it toward life
without parole, seems to attract a lot of jurors nowadays. BOWERS: Yes. SHORT: But you don’t think that’s a good substitute
for the death penalty? BOWERS: Well, it may be. That’s not for me to say. That’s for the people to say. I will make a prediction: I think in 10 or
15 years we won’t have a death penalty because of the phenomena you just mentioned. It’s a tough thing to ask a juror to participate
in sentencing someone to death, and most folks don’t like to do it. And they would much rather sentence someone
to life without parole and not have that on their conscience. So I don’t think it’s going to last long,
I really don’t. SHORT: Mike, you’ve been described as a fast-pitch-swinging
Attorney General who was willing to swing for the fences for open government and open
records. You have a wonderful record in that regard. Do you recall some of your activities while
Attorney General in those areas? BOWERS: Oh, yeah. I remember a lot of them. SHORT: Can you tell us� BOWERS: Some of the most significant memories
I have of being in office deal with open records matters. For example, in the ’80s after we in the Attorney
General’s office had conducted an extensive investigation into ticket fencing with the
State Patrol and incurred the wrath of Tom Murphy, whose pet agency, the State Patrol,
was, and others, I got into a raucous with the state personnel board over the manner
in which they had conducted the hearing of Scott Coleman, who was Terry Coleman’s brother. So it was all — you know, there’s a lot of
relationships involved. And I sued the personnel board. They then, along with Governor Harris, filed
a Bar complaint against me to get me disbarred for suing my client. As a result, the state Supreme Court issued
a new Bar rule that basically — it’s still on the books. It basically says if you’re a full-time lawyer
representing government, it’s not a violation of the Code of Ethics for you to sue your
own client, which I had to do I felt to ensure that they obeyed the open records law or open
meetings law. Had another one when I had to sue the board
of regents over the final list of candidates — I believe it was for the presidency at
Georgia State, when they picked the fellow from South Carolina. Nice guy whose name I cannot remember. He was on that list. They didn’t want to turn over the list. I sued them. The Supreme Court said they would turn it
loose. The fact of the matter is for me serving as
Attorney General, I was a little bit of a renegade in that I didn’t have a lot of political
allies, both from the standpoint of what I thought was right and from the standpoint
of what was practical, political for me, it was easy to be for open government. I mean, it’s just that simple. SHORT: Well, also you advocated a statewide
grand jury. BOWERS: Yes. And your friend and mine, Zell Miller, took
that on as a project one time and got it past the Senate. And the reason I was for it and still am,
one of the things that precludes Georgia from dealing with political corruption as effectively
as it ought is a very important right that we have to be tried for criminal matters in
the county where the crime occurred. Well, if you take into consideration we have
159 counties, that’s breaking it up mighty fine. So if you’re got a county commission that’s
doing something wrong, they’re probably doing it in their home county. Who’s going to try them? The folks that elected them to office. It doesn’t make sense. And I’ve always thought that especially for
certain kinds of crimes we need a statewide grand jury and prosecuting system to remove
the potential taint that occurs from trying prominent people on their home turf. That simple. SHORT: As I recall, both of those issues were
not accepted by the Speaker of the House. BOWERS: That’s correct. But now, if I had proposed the plan of salvation
and had a certified copy brought down by the archangel, I couldn’t have got it through
the House of Representatives, Bob. It was that simple. The Speaker and I just couldn’t get along. SHORT: One of your opinions, as I recall,
I think it was in 1989, had to do with the deliberations of the state ethics commission
in which you ruled that that information was public, even after they had had their deliberations. Do you recall that opinion? BOWERS: I don’t recall it; but as a general
rule, any meeting of public officials in Georgia has to be open. Beyond that, I don’t remember that specific
one. I remember the one when they filed a Bar complaint
against me. I remember that well. I remember the fight that went to Supreme
Court with the board of regents. I know there were others, but the one you
just asked me about I don’t remember. SHORT: Do you think that Georgia’s ethics
laws are strong enough? BOWERS: As a general rule, yes. Do there need to be some modifications? Yeah, there do. But as a general rule, the laws themselves
are strong enough. It’s some of the enforcement mechanisms that
need to be stronger. For example, that statewide grand jury and
prosecuting system, that would add immensely. We’ve got a provision that applies the Code
of Ethics to bodies, boards, bureaus, commissions and such — it’s in Title 45 — that are created
by general law. Well, county commissions and city councils
are not created by general law. If you just change that to make the Code of
Ethics applicable and applicable with teeth to county commissions and city councils, we
would probably be in pretty good shape. We’ve got a good open meetings and open records
law. And as I understand it now, if government
loses one of those cases they have to pay the other side’s attorney’s fees. That makes a lot of sense. The time that I spent as Attorney General
was incredibly exciting. As I had told you before we started this interview,
I wouldn’t trade it for anything, but I wouldn’t go back to it for anything either. And I suppose part of that is just a function
of getting older. What I was privileged to see is some extraordinary
people, like Zell Miller, like George Busbee, to get to know some people that have made
a difference in how our state functions and to whom you have to give a lot of credit in
terms of why Georgia positively — in a positive way — stands out. Like Carl Sanders, he wasn’t governor while
I was here, but I got to know him pretty well. Carl Sanders is an extraordinary leader. George Busbee is one of the finest men I ever
met, just a good guy. Miller, brilliant; absolutely brilliant, best
politician I have ever put my eyes on. Nobody can hold a candle to him. And I say that in a positive way. He had a sense not only of what people wanted
but what they needed, and the best illustration I can give you as a stroke of true political
genius is the state lottery and the Hope Scholarship Program. There are few things with the political brilliance
of that. Roy Barnes, he wasn’t governor while I was
there, but Roy is one of the smartest folks I ever met in politics and an absolute delight. He is one of the funniest human beings I’ve
ever been around. I like Roy. Sonny Perdue, a fine man, the perfect transition
governor for a state like Georgia. He’s not threatening to the general public. He’s one of them. And his views are theirs. And if we had had a republican like Mike Bowers
become the first governor and create and raise a bunch of cain, it would be a disaster. So maybe the people have a lot more sense
than I do. But I saw this political change. I saw Georgia go from a one-party state, virtually
all democratic from top to bottom, and I saw it change in a very short period of time to
a two-party state, and now it’s become another one-party state with a different party. And it’s all happened since I’ve been involved
in politics, a very short period of time, 25 years. SHORT: Before we get into some of your reflections
on politics, I’d like to ask you this question� BOWERS: Sure. SHORT: This is moving the clock way ahead,
and it’s something that has really disturbed me. I get political blogs on the computer all
the time, and it seems to me that some of them are unethical, defamation of character,
libelous, outright lies. Is there any legal defense for a person who
is a subject of those blogs? BOWERS: Yes. Any time — the answer is yes. Any time anyone makes a statement about you
that is false that tends to detract from your character or reputation and they publish that,
however it’s — publication need only involve one additional person. That is defamation under Georgia law, which
makes the party making the statement and publication liable, yes. Yes, there is no question. I’ve tried defamation cases. They’re rare and they’re tough cases, but,
yes, you can do something about it. SHORT: Well, if I were a politician nowadays
running for public office, I would be tempted to do something about it because they’re getting
pretty bad. BOWERS: They are. I’ll tell you the rules I follow, if nothing
else, Bob, to keep my own sanity with the press: Number one, always call them back. Two, I’ve made myself available at all times. I’ve been interviewed in a barber’s chair
about the flag one time. Three, tell them the truth; no matter how
bad it is, tell them the truth. Four, never read what they write about you,
and that pertains to what you just asked about. If you read what the press writes about you
and you’re in politics, two things always happen: You get your sense of your own importance
overly inflated because you’re not as good as they say on any given day or you get so
deflated you can’t stand yourself and you’re never as bad as they say. So, I have never�I do not to this day, read
what is written about me. And rule five, the last thing, when I was
in politics and in government I always tried to do more than they could report on. And you never had to sell a story that way. They were always coming to you. SHORT: Prior to your last election as Attorney
General, you switched from the Democratic party to the Republican party. BOWERS: Uh-huh. SHORT: Let’s talk for a minute about why you
did that. BOWERS: Well, one reason is, other than Zell,
I didn’t get along too well with the democratic leadership, and it was particularly the Speaker. He and I could not get along, and I am sure
it was not all his fault. I’d like to think it wasn’t all my fault. We just didn’t get along. I don’t know all the reasons, but we couldn’t
have agreed on anything. That was part of it. Part of it, I didn’t like Bill Clinton. I just couldn’t stand him. I still don’t. And it’s not because of any misdeeds; it’s
because he’s a draft dodger. And I lost 20 classmates in Vietnam, 20 West
Point classmates, and I just don’t like draft dodgers. SHORT: So you switched to the Republican party
and sought reelection. BOWERS: Yep. SHORT: And you were reelected. BOWERS: Yep. And I was told I was going to get beat. I was told you’re a dead duck. SHORT: As I recall, the Speaker was very active
in that campaign. BOWERS: He was. SHORT: And he actually had a good friend run
against you� BOWERS: Wesley Dunn. SHORT: Wesley, yeah. BOWERS: Wesley Dunn, who I see every once
in a while now, and we’re on very good terms. But he got Wesley to run against me, and it
turned out pretty good for me. I was pleased. SHORT: You won very handily. Let’s go back for a minute to 1964 when President
Lyndon Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act I believe. BOWERS: Right. SHORT: And remarked to Senator Russell, you
know, “Friend Dick, I’m turning the South over to the Republicans.” And yet it took in Georgia some 30-odd years
before the Republican party really became the ruling party in the state. How do you think that transpired? BOWERS: Well, I think President Johnson was
absolutely correct. The Voting Rights Act undoubtedly was needed
when it came into being. It actually came into being in 1965, but it
was effective November the 1st of ’64. It has probably done as much to ensure that
the South as a block went from being the solid democratic South to becoming the solid republican
South, and it did so by making the democratic party so heavily dependent on minority vote. For better or worse, that occurred. And by being so dependent on minority vote,
the democratic party could not appeal to middle white America�just can’t. And Mr. Obama, or Senator Obama, is suffering
some of that today. Why did it take so long in Georgia as compared
to other states? We were probably the last state in the union
to elect a republican governor following reconstruction. I think it’s in large part because of the
skill and political acumen of the democratic leaders that we had, the George Busbees, the
Zell Millers, Tom Murphy — give the devil his due — and others. They were very skilled at maintaining coalitions
between urban blacks and rural conservative whites, extraordinarily skilled. And they kept the democratic party in power
for much longer than it might have otherwise stayed in power. SHORT: 1994 was a big year for the republicans
in Georgia. That was the year as I recall that you were
reelected. BOWERS: Yes. SHORT: And that followed a period when the
republican party had presented good candidates. Bo Callaway had won the congressional seat
in 1966� BOWERS: Right. SHORT: No, I’m sorry, 1964. He ran for governor in 1966 and actually won
the election, popular vote; but Lester Maddox won in the legislature. And then came along Paul Coverdell and then
came along Senator Mattingly, and those I think were — could be considered the strong
components of the republican party at that time. Now that the republicans have succeeded in
taking over Georgia politics, what’s on the horizon? BOWERS: I don’t see — in what time I have
left, I don’t see Georgia changing. I don’t see it changing�I don’t see us having
a democratic governor for a long time. I don’t see us having a democratic House and
Senate for a long time. I don’t see the majority of our congressional
delegation or either U.S. Senator being a democrat for a long time. I probably�absent some major scandal or
major demographic shift, it is not going to happen. Now, is that good or bad? I’ll leave that for others to say; but it
is not going to happen. And it is a function of demographics. As long as Georgia stays about 70 percent
white, it will stay republican, and that’s just the way it is. SHORT: You mentioned the governors that you
served with, Busbee, Harris, and Miller. I’m sure you remember the legendary battles
between Governor Miller and Speaker Murphy. BOWERS: Yep, participated in a couple of them. SHORT: Really? You didn’t stay neutral? BOWERS: No. I was on Zell’s side. SHORT: Were you? BOWERS: Right. SHORT: Were there any issues before your political
department at that time that you had to decide because of the feud? BOWERS: Yeah. There was one I remember very well, and it
really wasn’t that close a call. But it involved Miller, Governor Miller�well,
he was Lieutenant Governor at the time�Lieutenant Governor Miller, Tom Moreland who was highway
commissioner, myself on one side, and the Speaker and others on the other side. And it was over the funding of the Department
of Transportation with the motor fuel tax, whether that — what control, if any, the
legislature had over the motor fuel tax. And I think the law is very clear–it still
is; none, it has no control whatsoever. SHORT: Speaking of the Department of Transportation,
Governor Sanders in 1962 or three got some legislation passed that would remove the board
— the choosing of the board from the governor’s appointment to the legislature electing them. Do you think that that has kept politics out
of the transportation board? BOWERS: Absolutely not. And someone long before me said this: You
can’t take politics out of politics. I mean, it is as political as you can get. When you elect the members of a highway board
or a transportation board, they are elected by members of the House and Senate. It can’t get more political than that. What it probably has had the effect of doing,
Bob, is to make the board of transportation even more powerful than it ever was. And it is in some respects the most powerful
entity in Georgia government because it has independent automatic funding that doesn’t
have to go through the legislature. When you pump gas, DOT gets money. SHORT: Is there a way to prevent that? Can some program be devised, some legislation
be devised that would prevent the members of the General Assembly from electing each
other? BOWERS: Yeah. You could put some prohibitions on who serves
on the board. I don’t — that ain’t going to happen. That’s not going to happen in the short term. It would take a constitutional amendment. It doesn’t have a lot of sex appeal. That’s not an issue that’s going to get a
lot of folks interested, in my judgment. So I’m not sure it would be worth a political
chess it would take to get it through the legislature. SHORT: In 1997 you resigned from the office
of Attorney General to run for governor. BOWERS: Right. SHORT: Tell us about that race. BOWERS: It was stormy�stormy. And it was of my own doing; I’m the captain
of my own ship. When I started running, I knew that there
were some things I had to reveal, and namely an extramarital affair, which I did. And it made for a stormy campaign. Would I do it again? Yeah, I’d do it again. I learned a lot. I’m a better person. My wife and I have a better marriage because
of it. I don’t have any regrets, Bob. Life’s too short, and I’ve been very fortunate. I’ve been able to be reasonably successful
practicing law and made more money than I ever dreamed I would make, so I don’t have
any regrets at all. SHORT: Your opponent was well know and well
financed, yet you almost beat him. BOWERS: Yeah. And, you know, almost ain’t good enough in
politics. It’s kind of like baseball. If you almost hit it over the fence, it don’t
count. It’s not a homerun. But, I mean, it was a wonderful learning experience,
learning this state. I benefit from having run now�I benefit
in terms of my business here in this law firm. SHORT: Well, with the exception of the Speaker,
how did you get along with the members of the House? How’d you get along with Denmark Groover? BOWERS: Well, very well. I like Denmark Groover, and I think he liked
me. I got along with all of them, and I bear no
ill will towards the Speaker. I had talked to his daughter before he passed
away, and I told her, for what it’s worth — she and my wife are on a commission together. And I said for what it’s worth, I forgive;
I hope there’s no hard feelings on the part of your family�life is too short to bear
grudges. And when you do, you’re letting the other
fellow run your life, and I’m not going to do that. I don’t — I look back on it and laugh about
things more than anything else. It was an incredible learning experience. It was a chance to do things as a truck driver’s
son — my dad never finished elementary school. I’ve been able to do things he would have
never dreamed of�I never dreamed of. And I don’t bear any ill will. I got along with most of the members of the
legislature. I’m sure there’s some that disliked me intensely. Are there any that I dislike intensely? No. Are there some that I don’t trust? Yes. Are there some that I wouldn’t particularly
want to represent? Yeah; but if they paid me, I probably would. But all in all, it was incredibly exciting
on a day-to-day level dealing with legal issues — just beyond belief. I got to argue in the U.S. Supreme Court a
case involving — SHORT: Yeah, I was going to ask you about
that. BOWERS: Oh, it’s an unbelievable experience
for a lawyer. I got to know judges and lawyers all over
Georgia. When I first got hired, Arthur Bolton had
me prosecuting judges for the Judicial Qualifications Commission. Just an unbelievable experience for a young
lawyer. I got to meet President Carter while he was
governor and met with him after he got elected. That’s not things that many folks get to do. So on a day-to-day level, it was interesting,
exciting, and frequently very worthwhile. We got to help some people along the way. On a political level, I saw Georgia change
from a one-party democratic state to a one-party republican state almost while I was sitting
there watching it go on around me. And all of that’s just fascinating, fascinating. SHORT: Let me quote you something I read in
the Georgia Trend Magazine, which has chosen you for many, many years as one of the 100
most influential people in Georgia. Here’s what they say: “Even though the former
Attorney General Bowers and one-time gubernatorial candidate, says ‘I will never run or serve
again,’ he still swings with plenty of statewide clout.” You have no interest in running for public
office again? BOWERS: No, I don’t. And it is not out of bitterness; it is not
out of any factor other than I have a family, I have a farm, I’ve got eight grandchildren
— my wife and I do — and I’m more interested in that and this law firm. This law firm has been so good to me, and
I’ve tried to be good to it. I work with an extraordinary group of young
lawyers, men and women, and I just�I don’t want to do it, Bob. And plus, I’m too old. I’m 66. Life moves on. Now, am I saying John McCain’s too old to
be President? No. He’s a different fellow than I am. But for me with my family circumstances, I’m
too old and not interested. Will I continue to be interested in what goes
on around me? Yes. Do I care about good government? Absolutely. And I’ll try to support good candidates. I’ll speak out on issues when it is appropriate,
but I enjoy what I’m doing and I wouldn’t trade this whole experience for anything. SHORT: Well, as you look back at your career
both in and out of public life, what is your fondest memory or memories? BOWERS: It would be a handful of cases where
I felt fortunate enough to have made a difference in that case, and making a difference in that
case made a difference in somebody’s life. I can tell you real quick there’s not many. One was the U.S. Supreme Court case, getting
to argue that case. I had worked on it with a Special Assistant
Attorney General, David Walbert. He had argued it the first time it went to
Supreme Court; I argued it the second time. I think what we did in that case overall is
to limit the impact of the Voting Rights Act, which, before the case, the Justice Department
was essentially saying meant that states such as Georgia had to maximize minority voting
opportunity, minority electoral opportunities, gerrymander to ensure the maximum number of
black congressmen or what have you. That case changed that interpretation. So that’s important. Another case was the prosecution of Sam Caldwell. I had — still to this day have nothing personal
against him, his memory, or his family. But that case helped clean up Georgia government. And it sent a signal if you do this kind of
thing somebody’s going to prosecute you other than the federal government. And I think we made Georgia’s government a
little better. I had a case after I came in this law firm
where eight ladies came to me that were being discriminated against on the basis of race. One of them was a first cousin of mine. We took the case, had no idea it would turn
out as it did and we got a $24 million verdict. We collected 18.5 and made all of them millionaires,
did pretty well for me and some of my law partners. And I’ll never forget the jury coming back
with that verdict. It was just — I thought I was going to cry. I represented a family four or five years
ago from down here in Butts County whose property had been condemned 35 years ago and they were
left with a 45-acre tract that they couldn’t get into right next to the state prison at
Jackson. And they had come to me when I was Attorney
General, and I couldn’t figure out a way to help them. They came to me later, and one of my young
partners, David Marmins and I figured out how we could help them. And we got them access, and it was — I’ll
never forget when the jury came back with its verdict, it was a wonderful feeling. And the last one I’ll mention occurred in
December. I represented a young man who was accused
of some crimes. He’d been a police chief over in Jefferson
in my home county, Jackson County. And he got indicted three times, and we beat
every indictment. And when that grand jury the last time came
back with a no bill, that was thrilling, just absolutely thrilling. He just cried so bad I threw him my handkerchief. And he was crying, and he gave me these handkerchiefs. I don’t carry engraved handkerchiefs, that’s
not me. But he gave me these MJB-engraved handkerchiefs
for Christmas last year because I gave him a handkerchief at the grand jury. And, yeah, those are some of the most poignant
memories. There are a lot of others. I could go on for hours. I’ve been — I have had some of the most interesting
cases that you could ever, ever imagine. Some won, some lost; but I wouldn’t trade
it. And I hope there will be some more, hope there
will be some more. SHORT: Your biggest disappointment? BOWERS: Personal. Not living up to the standards I should have
and disappointing the family. But it worked out, and I’m thankful. I have no excuse, but you asked; that’s it. Professional disappointment, I was disappointed
to lose the republican nomination for governor in ’98, but as I look back and as it has turned
out, it was the greatest blessing imaginable. I would — I would — on a higher level, political
level, I would like to see a little more attention by government to the legal system. It’s so delicate. It doesn’t have any army, doesn’t have police,
it can’t appropriate money; and yet it’s the last place to protect our liberties, the last
bastion of liberties, the jury trial, so on, and making sure that we fund it in a way that
will attract bright people. I can’t imagine why somebody wants to be a
judge today; it doesn’t pay anything. My wife and I have a 44-year-old son that’s
a judge, and I think why are you doing this? You don’t make didley. But he does, and he loves it. Making sure that the judicial system is funded
in a way that will attract and keep good people, I’d like to see more of that. I’m a little disappointed. My party is not really fond of lawyers, judges,
and the legal system, and that’s not healthy. SHORT: How would you like to be remembered? BOWERS: I would like to be — that’s easy. I would like to be remembered in the same
breath as Oglethorpe’s motto: “Nescit Cedere.” “He did not know how to give up.” That’s how I’d like to be remembered. SHORT: And that’s how you will be remembered. BOWERS: Well, I don’t know. That isn’t for me to say. SHORT: Thank you, Mike. BOWERS: Thank you, Bob. SHORT: I really appreciate it. BOWERS: Well, I’m delighted to get to chat
with you. SHORT: Well, thank you. BOWERS: It’s an honor. [END OF RECORDING]

Fight against the might of city-based politics


Dobry wieczór. Zapraszamy na nasz program. To jest spór między miastem a wsią, pomiędzy przyjaciółmi i sąsiadami, między walką ze zmianami klimatu a tanią, niezawodną energią. Chodzi o plan zainstalowania ponad 100 gigantycznych turbin na wzgórzach Mount Lofty Ranges i o ludzi, którzy nie chcą mieszkać obok elektrowni. Wygląda na to, że ci ludzie przegrywają z polityczną siłą miasta. Reportaż Hendrika Gouta. Co mecz futbolu australijskiego ma wspólnego z tym: plakat z turbinami z napisem „zabójcy” Witam, nazywam się Gillon McLachlan. Nic, poza tym, że Gillon McLachlan, dyrektor Ligii Futbolu Australijskiego AFL, wychował się na farmie w pobliżu góry Mount Pleasant. Farma przy drodze Angus Valley, której granica ciągnie się przez wiele kilometrów tuż obok planowanych turbin. McLachlan koncentruje się na piłce, ale nawet w trakcie rozgrywek ligi nie zapomina o tym – to wschodnia część Mount Lofty Ranges, gdzie zagraniczna spółka, Trustpower, chce zbudować elektrownię na obszarze 26 kilometrów na 10 kilometrów, z 114 turbinami wiatrowymi na wzgórzach takich jak te. Każda z turbin jest wyższa od najwyższego drapacza chmur w Adelajdzie, z łopatami długimi na 65 metrów, a tak daleko kopnąć potrafi niewielu futbolistów. Mój ojciec angażował się bardzo w negocjowanie umów między spółką wiatrakową a właścicielami ziemi. Ojciec był niedawno w północnej Szkocji, gdzie z przerażeniem zdał sobie sprawę, jak ogromne są nowoczesne turbiny i jak bardzo niszczą krajobraz. Po zmontowaniu każda turbina sięgać będzie wyżej niż najwyższy budynek w Adelajdzie, a będzie ich w sumie sto kilkanaście. Niedawno ponad 1000 osób maszerowało w Adelajdzie przeciwko zmianom klimatycznym. W odpowiedzi rząd zapowiedział budowę 24 nowych farm wiatrowych. Następnie premier rządu stanowego, z Partii Pracy, która ma poparcie tylko w miastach, poleciał specjalnym odrzutowcem z grupą 20 zwolenników na szczyt w Paryżu. Premier Południowej Australii Jay Wetherall:
Jeśli jesteś międzynarodowym przywódcą, nie możesz chować światła pod korcem*.
* cytat z Ewangelii Mateusza 5:15 Z premierem poleciała też za pieniądze podatników ekipa filmowa. Ci demonstranci mają bardzo daleko do najbliższej farmy wiatrowej. Tymczasem protestujący tutaj będą ją mieli tuż obok. Uważamy, że powstanie tej farmy wiatrowej będzie miało zdecydowanie negatywny wpływ na warunki naszego życia. Chcę jedynie powiedzieć, że nie chcę farmy wiatrowej w Palmer. Cambrai – liczba mieszkańców: 501. To nie jest tak, że w Cambrai są przeciwko niestałej, zawodnej energii. Ale większość osób mieszkających na obszarze między Cambrai, Sanderston i Palmer nie chce na swoim terenie elektrowni wraz z całą infrastrukturą, nawet jeśli napędzana ma być przez wiatr. Kto zagwarantuje, że nie będziemy narażeni na ciągły hałas niskiej częstotliwości i infradźwięki generowane przez turbiny? Dlatego przyszli tutaj na spotkanie z radą gminną, która ma zdecydować, czy zatwierdzić farmę wiatrową. Jesteśmy tutaj, bo chodzi o nasze życie. Chodzi też o nasze bezpieczeństwo. Tu jest nasz dom. To jest nasze zabezpieczenie na starość. A ta spółka chce nam to wszystko zabrać. Ci, którzy nie mogli przybyć na zebranie osobiście, uczestniczyli za pomocą połączenia wideo. Farmę Rosebank zbudowali moi krewni w 1860 r. i od tego czasu pozostaje własnością mojej rodziny. Nasza rodzina mogła postawić turbiny na naszej ziemi. Ale nie zrobiliśmy tego ze względu na nasze przywiązanie do Rosebank, oraz ze względu na przyszłość naszych synów i córek i ich potomstwa, przyszłość nasz społeczności. Jednak niektórzy ludzie zawierzyli firmie Trustpower (trustpower znaczy energia godna zaufania). Było około 150 wniosków przeciwko farmie wiatrowej i około 25 za nią. Ogromna większość społeczności sprzeciwia się inwestycji. A jednak społeczność jest podzielona. O tak, brat przeciwko bratu, sąsiad przeciwko sąsiadowi, to nie jest miłe. W Adelajdzie – globalne ocieplenie. W Cambrai – zajadły spór. Ta inwestycja już podzieliła społeczność. Ludzie, którzy byli kumplami przez 30 lat teraz ze sobą nie rozmawiają. Dosłownie paru właścicieli ziemi dostało pieniądze od Trustpower za zgodę na postawienie dużej ilości turbin na ich ziemi. Te umowy są super tajne. Osoby, które je podpiszą, mają zakaz wnoszenia jakichkolwiek skarg w przyszłości. Zacytuję tylko jedno zdanie z umowy: “Strona zobowiązana jest traktować jako poufne wszelkie informacje udostępnione jej na podstawie niniejszego aktu, w tym informacje o istnieniu niniejszego aktu”. Natomiast spada wartość sąsiednich nieruchomości. Piękno jest rzeczą względną; o tym, czy coś jest szpetne decyduje właściciel ziemi. Sędzia federalny Kate Hughes uznała, że farmy wiatrowe powodują spadek wartości sąsiednich nieruchomości. W jednym przypadku uznała, że wartość nieruchomości spadnie prawdopodobnie o 33 procent. Powiedzcie mi, czy to nie zeszpeci wyglądu wzgórz wschodnich Mount Lofty Ranges. Jestem całkowicie sceptyczny, co do korzyści netto z tej inwestycji, jeśli uwzględnić potencjalną utratę wartości gruntów na całym tym obszarze. Pismo kasy oszczędnościowo-kredytowej People’s Choice do potencjalnego kredytobiorcy: “Nie możemy przyznać kredytu mieszkaniowego z powodu farmy wiatrowej.” Dla mnie to jest przerażające. Końcówki tych łopat obracają się z prędkością niemal 300 kilometrów na godzinę. Nawet gdyby ustalono jednoznacznie, że hałas z farm wiatrowych nie powoduje problemów zdrowotnych, jest on uciążliwy i ma wpływ na jakość życia. Jedna rzecz to przejechać się obok farmy wiatrowej i uznać, że nikomu nie przeszkadzają. Zupełnie czym innym jest być narażonym na ich oddziaływanie cały czas, każdego dnia, przez resztę swojego życia. Ale na posiedzeniach zarządów spółek będących największymi pracodawcami w Południowej Australii słychać jeszcze inny hałas. Forsowanie prądu z wiatru i słońca powoduje wzrost cen energii, które są już prawie dwukrotnie wyższe niż w stanach Wiktoria i Nowa Południowa Walia, a najgorsze jeszcze przed nami. We wtorek władze stanu spotkały się z głównymi odbiorcami i dostawcami energii elektrycznej. Koncern Nyrstar powiedział rządowi, że ceny elektryczności, jak i potencjalne przerwy w dostawach prądu powodowane przez niestałą energię, zagrażają kluczowej modernizacji huty Port Pirie. Jednak “cała polityka jest lokalna”. A lokalni mieszkańcy są wściekli. Widzieliśmy z naszych własnych domów, jak samolot ratowniczy zszedł na wysokość koron drzew, żeby uratować naszych przyjaciół. Nie mógłby tego zrobić wśród lasu turbin. Dla mnie — i jak sądzę, podobnie jak dla wielu rozsądnych ludzi — jest czymś niesłychanym, że podmioty z zewnątrz mogą zdecydować o budowie ogromnej, przygniatającej, na stałe wpisanej w krajobraz infrastruktury, z której finansowe korzyści będą ciągnąć oni sami, zmuszając przy tym innych do życia w sąsiedztwie czegoś, co w trwały, przygnębiający sposób na zawsze niszczy ten piękny teren. Spółka Trustpower robi dokładnie to samo co wszyscy promotorzy inwestycji wiatrakowych. Ich dewizą jest “dziel i rządź”. Dzielą przyjaciół, dzielą rodziny i idą gdzie indziej. Nawet jeśli ta inwestycja nie zostanie zrealizowana, potrzeba będzie całego pokolenia, żeby odbudować poczucie wspólnoty w naszej społeczności. (Polskie napisy: stopwiatrakom.eu)

NEWS | Pompeo taps Trump critic to lead Venezuela effort Politics


NEWS | Pompeo taps Trump critic to lead Venezuela effort Politics Describing Elliott Abrams as a “seasoned, principled and tough minded foreign policy veteran,” Pompeo announced that the former deputy national security adviser to President George W. Bush will “lead our efforts on Venezuela.” The job, Pompeo announced, will start immediately, as Abrams will accompany the secretary of state on Saturday at a United Nations Security Council meeting on the situation in Venezuela. President Donald Trumps decision Wednesday to recognize Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaido as the countrys interim president and declare Maduros embattled regime “illegitimate” has set off a dramatic confrontation within Venezuela and geopolitical jostling outside the country. A surprise pick “Its a global challenge,” Pompeo said at the State Department on Friday. “Elliott will have responsibility for all things related to our efforts to restore democracy in Venezuela,” Pompeo continued. “There are multiple dimensions to how we hope to assist the Venezuelans in achieving democracy there, and he will be responsible for leading that effort.” Abrams, who also served in President Ronald Reagans administration, noted he had left the State Department “30 years ago this week, last time I worked here. So its very nice to be back. This crisis in Venezuela is deep and difficult and dangerous, and I cant wait to get to work on it.” Abrams was a surprise pick, having been job at the State Department under former Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, after the President learned of Abrams scathingly critical remarks about him. Scathing critic of Trump Tillerson tried to convince Trump to make Abrams his deputy because he felt he needed Abrams foreign policy experience, according to multiple sources. Then White House chief of staff Reince Priebus and senior adviser Jared Kushner also strongly supported Abrams and urged Trump to reconsider, the sources said. Abrams penned an opinion piece in May 2016 in The Weekly Standard titled “” after Trump clinched enough support to become the GOPs presumptive nominee. “The party has nominated someone who cannot win and should not be president of the United States,” Abrams wrote in the first line of the article. Despite that critique, Abrams never signed any of the open letters that top GOP foreign policy officials penned opposing Trumps nomination. The criticism went both ways. Trump has lambasted policies advocated by Abrams. While in the White House, Abrams supported the Iraq War, which Trump backed in its early days but soon vigorously opposed particularly on the 2016 campaign trail as a “stupid” decision. And Trump has frequently argued against other views embraced by neoconservatives like Abrams, including that the US has wasted too many resources abroad, particularly in trying to promote democracies in the Middle East. Those criticisms seemed to have been set aside, as Pompeo welcomed Abrams warmly, saying his “passion for the rights and liberties of all peoples makes him a perfect fit and valuable and timely addition” to the State Department team.

Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn | 2016 Republican National Convention


>>ANNOUNCER: Please welcome a
retired United States Army Lieutenant, Mike Flynn.>>I don’t know how you all — M
Melania Trump, whose going to be the next first lady of the
United States the of America. Another big round of applause
for her.>>MIKE: Unbelievable.
What an exciting — I’m here tonight as a determined American
who loves our country. And my message to you is very
clear. Wake up, America.
There is no substitute for American leadership and
exceptionalism. America should not fear
enemies. In fact, we should clearly
define our enemies. Face them head on.
And defeat those that seek to turn our country and our way of
lifeful. That’s right.
Good for you. Tonight, we stand together as
proud patriots who dearly love our country and believe in
freedom, democracy, and liberty.
[ cheering ]>>MIKE: USA, you’re darn
right. Get it going.
USA, USA.
USA. Get fired up.
This is about this country. This is about the future of our
children. We know that America, our
nation, is the greatest country in the history of the world.
[ clapping ]>>MIKE: There will never be a
substitute for America. And let us say our country holds
a unique place and role in America American history and
exceptionalism. It will never fade.
It is up to us. And you cannot sit this election
out. I stand with you as a citizen, a
veteran, a patriot, but more importantly, as an American to
tell you that the path — in the
interest of other nations ahead of our own will end when Donald
Trump is President. [ cheering and applause ]>>MIKE: Trump, Trump, Trump.
There you go. [ chanting “Trump” ]
>>MIKE: From this day forward, we must stand tougher and
stronger together with an
unrelenting goal to — and to never be satisfied with —
Obama — like Hillary Clinton. [ cheering and applause ]
>>MIKE: We must draw from the rich foundation of our founding
fathers’ fight for democracy,
and lead friends and allies with more determination than ever
before, with conviction in our beliefs that pierces through the
ideology of any people or any nation that attacks America,
America’s way of life, and our proud heritage of fearlessness
and courage. [ cheering and applause ]>>MIKE: Tonight, Americans
stand as one, with strength and confidence to overcome the last
eight years of the Obama/Clinton
failures, such as bumbling indecisiveness, ignorance, and
total incompetence that challenged the very heart and
soul of every American and single-handedly continued
mayhem, murder, and destruction in our neighborhoods and on the
streets. [ cheering and applause ]
>>MIKE: On this day, we start the beginning of a new American
sanctuary, a time when we turn our heads forward with
persistent and relentless focus, and — our communities, our
families, and our country, our feet firmly planted on the
ground, and by holding individuals accountable for
their actions, equally and fairly.
Our new American century does not risk its future on political
correctness and senseless hyperbole.
[ cheering and applause ]>>MIKE: Exactly.
Exactly. [ cheering and applause ]
>>MIKE: USA. You’ve got it.
That’s exactly right. It’s about this country.
That’s right. The time is now.
The time is now to recognize our obligation that we have to the
world, an obligation to lead the world with un-waiverring
integrity, and unapologetic
resolve. With Donald Trump in the White
House, we will make America great again!
[ cheering and applause ]>>Damn right. America’s one traditional,
undisputed role as world leader is now in jeopardy.
It’s in jeopardy, folks. The Obama/Clinton duo failed our
country by — America’s — and betraying our nation’s history
and our founding fathers’ revolutionary spirit that
established America on the principles of freedom and democracy.
American exceptional itch was —
exceptionalism was a core principle.
The United States said, our battles — on this doctrine, we
led the Allies to victory in World War II, against Nazi
Germany. [ cheering and applause ]
>>MIKE: USA, USA, USA. God help us.
Get fired up. [ chanting “USA” ]
>>MIKE: You are right. I love it.
We are the first country to put a man on the moon.
We ended the Cold War. We ended a war.
And we stopped. We stopped communism.
We stopped communism’s quest for world domination. As Ronald Reagan said, and I
quote, “If we lose freedom here, there is no place to escape to.”
This is the last stand on Earth.
[ cheering and applause ]>>MIKE: USA.
I love it. Great.
[ chanting “USA ” ]>>MIKE: A centerpiece of
American foreign policy was once the protection of the United
States and its people and interests in the world. Sadly, under the current
leadership, that is no longer the case.
This cannot stand, period. [ cheering and applause ]>>MIKE: We must recognize
America has enemies in the homeland and abroad.
And our military needs to be capable of protecting the nation
by finding and capturing our enemies.
The President must have the tools to deal with all threats
to this country, and must have guts to put them into action
whenever necessary. [ cheering and applause ]>>MIKE: And Donald Trump is
that leader! [ cheering and applause ]
>>MIKE: And I’m going to say that again.
Donald Trump is the that leader!
[ cheering and applause ]>>MIKE: We must regain our
ability to thoroughly crush our enemies.
Our soldiers deserve to hear
from their leaders with clarity and precision.
Too often — way too often — our troops are instead
distracted by trivial matters, trivial matters of our words,
what terminology is politically correct, and what bathroom door
to open up. [ cheering and applause ]
>>MIKE: My God. My God.
War is not in about bathrooms. War is not about political
correctness, or words that are meaningless.
War is about winning. War is about winning.
[ cheering and applause ]>>MIKE: There is no substitute.
There is no such thing as a runner-up.
And there are no consolation prizes.
A commander in chief does not draw red lines and retreat.
[ cheering and applause ]>>MIKE: America does not back
down from anyone or anything. [ cheering and applause ]
>>MIKE: That’s right. USA, USA, USA.
You’ve got it right, baby. That is exactly right.
Get fired up. [ chanting “USA” ]
>>MIKE: This is about this country.
It’s about our country. We are tired of Obama’s end
speeches and his misguided rhetoric.
This has caused the world to have no respect for America’s
word, nor does it fear our might.
Let me be clear. Coddling and displays of empathy
towards terrorists is not a strategy for defeating these
murderers, as Obama and Hillary Clinton would like us to
believe. [ cheering and applause ]>>MIKE: Releasing terrorists
will not end this war. [ cheering and applause ]>>MIKE: On the contrary, it
simply emboldens the terrorists and it prolongs the war.
Under Barack Obama, we have no coherent strategy to protect our
citizens. And under Hillary Clinton, it
will be more of the same. You’ve got it right. I’m infuriated when our
President bans criticism of our enemy.
I’m dead certain that we cannot win this war unless we are free
to call enemies by name — radical Islamists and failed
tyrants! [ cheering and applause ]>>MIKE: Because Obama’s
ill-advised actions, the world lost faith in American
leaderships, leadership, radical
Islam is developing across the
world. A complete lack of being age
able to face multiple fronts. Untold cyber threats. A struggling United States
economy unable to compete with a burgeoning Chinese economy.
Growing nuclear capabilities.
Russia and North Korea. And a lack of respect and
confidence around the globe. We have become the best enemies
and worst friends. And I’m going to say that
again. We have become the best enemies
and the worst friend. That has to change.
[ cheering and applause ]>>MIKE: The next four years
will become — the perils we face, and the so-called reset
buttons — failure. The Obama/Clinton failed foreign
policy list goes on, and on, and on.
We need a commander in chief who understands these challenges and
is willing to do whatever it takes to meet them head-on.
Our adversaries must never mock American will power.
And we must never give them a reason to doubt our resolve to
win. [ cheering and applause ]
>>MIKE: Thank you. The most damaging example of the
President’s failure to understand the consequences of
putting political expediency ahead of national security is
the emergence of ISIS. We cannot continue down this
path. Lives are at stake.
Our very life — way of life is in jeopardy.
Our very existence is threatened.
What keeps me up at night? What keeps me up at night is the sobering realization that evil
exists. The radicalization of Islam and
barbaric cause that influences
potentially millions in the world to join their cause should
keep us all up at night. We must — must — take
seriously the possibility that these enemies have weapons of
mass destruction and intend to use them.
That is a very serious issue. We must understand and define
our enemies if we intend to defeat them.
America and Americans deserve no less.
Because Obama chose to conceal the actions of terrorists, with Osama and the rise of radical
Islam, Americans are at a loss to fully understand the enormous
threat that they pose against us.
Now is the time for our — a leader that is honest and strong.
[ cheering ]>>MIKE: That’s exactly right.
A leader who will stand up for America and make — there you
go. And make absolutely clear that
if you cross her path, you will pay a price.
[ cheering and applause ]>>MIKE: You’ve got it.
We do not need a weak, spineless
President who is more concerned about making apologies than
presenting protecting Americans.
We do not need a reckless president who believes she is
above the law. [ cheering and applause ]>>MIKE: Lock her up.
That’s right. That’s right.
Lock her up. It’s unbelievable.
[ chanting “lock her up” ]>>MIKE: Yeah.
I use #neverHillary. That’s what I use.
I have called on Hillary Clinton.
I have called on Hillary Clinton to drop out of the race, because
she put our nation’s security at extremely high risk with their
careless use of private email servers. Lock her up.
[ chanting “lock her up ” ]>>MIKE: You guys are good.
Damn right. Exactly right.
There’s nothing wrong with that.
[ chanting “lock her up “[.
>>MIKE: And you know why we’re saying that?
We’re saying that because if I, a guy who knows this business,
if I did a tenth of what she did, I would be in jail today. So, Crooked Hillary Clinton,
leave this race now. [ cheering and applause ]>>MIKE: She needs to go.
[ chanting “lock her up ” ]
>>MIKE: Before I end, I will
repeat my belief that American exceptionalism is very real.
Let us not fear what we know to be true.
Let us not fear what we know to be true.
Instead, we should always remember that our country — our
country — was built upon Judeo Christian values and principles.
[ cheering and applause ]>>MIKE: And let us remember the
sacrifice of those who have gone before us.
America is unique. America is the greatest country
in the history of the world.
[ cheering ]>>MIKE: You’re darn right.
So get ready, America. Get ready.
Now is the time for fresh, bold leadership.
[ cheering and applause ]>>MIKE: Trump, trump, Trump.
Let’s go, come on.
[ chanting “Trump ” ]>>MIKE: We are just beginning.
I promise you that Donald Trump, Donald Trump, knows that the
primary role of the president is to keep us safe.
[ cheering and applause ]>>MIKE: He recognizes the
threats we face, and is not afraid to call them what they
are. Donald Trump’s leadership,
decision-making, and problem-solving abilities will
restore America’s role as undeniable and unquestioned
world leader. [ cheering and applause ]
>>MIKE: He will lead from the front, not behind.
He will lead with courage. Never vacillating when facing
our enemies or competitors. And he knows that the advantage
advantage — Donald Trump knows that the advantage in life, in
business, and in wartime goes to the competitor that does not
flinch and does not broadcast his game plan.
[ cheering and applause ]>>MIKE: Hey.
Don Trump, execute the fundamental tenet of peace
through strength. And there will be no apologies
for our American exceptionalism or leadership standing around
the world. [ cheering and applause ]
>>MIKE: Once again, once again,
wake up, America. You cannot sit this one out.
You cannot sit this election out.
Get out of your houses and get out there and vote.
And instead, let Donald Trump, as the next President of the
United States of America, thank

Signs of a fractured Republican Party?


CRUMBS. MARIA: SHE KEEPS ON GOING. IT’S ACTUALLY INCREDIBLE. JOINING THE CONVERSATION RIGHT NOW TO WEIGH IN IS CRTV HOST FOX NEWS CONTRIBUTOR WHO WILL BE SPEAKING AT CPAC, GOOD TO SEE YOU, THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR JOINING US THIS MORNING.>>GOOD MORNING, EVERYONE. MARIA: YOU WILL BE UP THERE WITH MICK MULVANEY AND WE WANT TO GET YOUR TAKE ON WHAT WE SHOULD EXPECT FROM THE PRESIDENT LATER TODAY?>>I’M VERY EXCITED TO BE HERE. I WAS ON THE AGENDA LAST YEAR AS WELL AND I’VE BEEN TO CPAC FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS NOW AND I WILL BE INTERVIEWING OMB DIRECTOR MICK AS A — MULL DEPUTY MULVANE MICK AS A — MULL DEPUTY MULVANY MICK AS A — MULL DEPUTY MULVAN. I GOT UP AT 4:00 THIS MORNING, PEOPLE WERE ONLINE BEFORE THEN. I THINK AT 3:00 A.M. SO THAT THEY COULD GET INSIDE, GET THROUGH SECURITY TO SEE PRESIDENT TRUMP AND HEAR WHAT HE HAS TO SAY TO AMERICA.>>JANINE, WHAT DO YOU THINK THE BIGGEST MESSAGE FROM PRESIDENT TRUMP TODAY COMING OUT OF CPAC, WHAT DO YOU THINK WILL BE THE PRIMARY FOCUS AND MESSAGE BEING DELIVERED?>>WELL, FIRST OF ALL, I WANT TO SAY NANCY PELOSI, KEEP ON TALKING BECAUSE HER COMMENTS WILL BE ALL OVER IN REGARDS TO THE MIDTERM ELECTIONS AND FOR THE 2020 ELECTIONS AS WELL. I THINK THE PRESIDENT IS REALLY GOING TO TALK ABOUT HIS ACCOMPLISHMENTS TO DATE JUST LIKE PENCE SAID, WITH THE TAX CUT, FOR EXAMPLE, OH, MY GOODNESS, THE NUMBER OF AMERICANS THAT ARE GETTING HIGHER WAGES, MORE JOB OPPORTUNITIES AND OTHER BENEFIT THAT IS THE COMPANIES WILL BE PROVIDING, I THINK OVER 300 COMPANIES NOW, HE WILL DEFINITELY HIT ON THAT AND ALSO TALK ABOUT HOW NANCY PELOSI CALLS THESE BONUSES CRUMBS AND MAYBE TO HER IT’S CRUMBS, MAYBE THAT’S THE CHANGE SHE CARRIES IN HER PURSE, MAYBE THAT’S REAL MONEY FOR REAL AMERICANS AND MONEY THAT FOLKS WILL NEED FOR FAMILIES, THEIR HOUSEHOLDS, FOR A BETTER LIFE. LEE: ONE OF THE THINGS, I HAVE BEEN GETTING QUESTIONS OF FOLKS, 40 PEOPLE ON GOP SIDE AREN’T RUNNING AGAIN IN MIDTERMS AND A LOT OF THEM SAYING IS THIS A SIGN THAT PEOPLE AREN’T SUPPORTING THE PRESIDENT, FRACTURED REPUBLICAN PARTY, THEY ARE ENERGETIC, CAN YOU TELL WHAT YOU SAY IT FEELS LIKE TO BE THERE AND DOES IT FEEL LIKE A UNIFIED REPUBLICAN PARTY BECAUSE A LOT OF PEOPLE SAYING THAT IT’S NOT?>>WELL, ON THE ONE HAND, YOU HAVE A DIFFERENCE OF OPINION BECAUSE YOU HAVE THE ESTABLISHMENT AND YOU HAVE THOSE WHO ARE STILL THE TEA PARTY PEOPLE AND BELIEVE IN SMALLER GOVERNMENT AND SO I ALSO SEE THE FACT THAT THERE ARE MORE NEW FACES THAT ARE RUNNING FOR OFFICE, SO THE FACT THAT SOME PEOPLE ARE NOT RUNNING FOR REELECTION, I DON’T SEE THAT AS AGAINST THE PRESIDENT, I SEE IT AS AN OPPORTUNITY FOR MORE VOICES, FOR MORE PEOPLE TO CARRY THAT CONSERVATIVE MESSAGE TO

UPDATE: More controversy in the Richmond County Democratic Party


COVERAGE YOU CAN COUNT ON BEGINS WITH CONTROVERSY IN THE RICHMOND COUNTY DEMOCRATIC PARTY.BACK IN MARCH, THE PARTY HAD FORMER SECRETARY JOE TRAINA ARRESTED FOR ATTENDING A MONTHLY MEETING. MEMBERS OF THE BOARD SAY HE WAS BEING “DISRUPTIVE.” RENETTA: NEWSCHANNEL 6’S SAMANTHA WILLIAMS WAS AT THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY’S APPRECIATION BREAKFAST THIS MORNING. SHE JOINS US LIVE WITH MORE, SAMANTHA– SAMANTHA: BACK IN FEBRUARY, CHAIRMAN MTESA COTTEMOOD SENT TRAINA A LETTER SAYING THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE VOTED UNANIMOUSLY TO SUSPEND HIS MEMBERSHIP INDEFINITELY– BUT ONE OF THOSE EXECUTIVE MEMBERS SAYS — THERE WAS NO VOTE. TRAINA HOLDS AN ELECTED SEAT… AND BELIEVES THIS FIGHT ISN’T FAIR. JOE TRAINA/ DEMOCRATIC PARTY: “YOU’RE SENDING A MESSAGE TO FOLKS THAT IF YOU JOIN A POLITICAL PARTY, YOU HAVE TO LOSE YOUR FIRST AMENDMENT ESSENTIALLY.” SAMANTHA: JOE TRAINA TELLS ME HE HAS BEEN A PART OF THE RICHMOND COUNTY DEMOCRATIC PARTY SINCE 2007– HE SERVED AS SECRETARY IN 20-12 AND THIS YEAR HOLDS THE DISTRICT 1, POST 7 COMMITTEE SEAT. HE SAYS THE TENSION THROUGHOUT THE LOCAL PARTY STARTED AFTER THE 20-18 ELECTION, WHEN HE AND SOME OTHER MEMBERS HELD THE BOARD ACCOUNTABLE TO THEIR BY-LAWS. JOE TRAINA/ DEMOCRATIC PARTY: “UNFORTUNATELY THEY WERE NOT CONDUCTED PROPERLY. AT THE NEXT MEETING WE WANTED TO GET THOSE RESULTS AND ASK THEM ABOUT THE INCONSISTENCIES OF THE ELECTION.” SAMANTHA: HE QUESTIONED THE BOARD IN FEBRUARY– FOLLOWING CHAIRPERSON MTESA WRIGHT SENDING TRAINA A LETTER, TELLING HIM HIS MEMBERSHIP WAS SUSPENDED AND THAT HE SHOULD SEEK “MULTIPLE FORMS OF PSYCHOLOGICLA, MENTAL, SOCIAL AND FORENSIC EVALUATIONS.” TRAINA SAYS HE DID GO TO THE NEXT MONTH’S MEETING– TO ASK ABOUT THE LETTER. THAT IS WHEN HE WAS ARRESTED. JOE TRAINA/ DEMOCRATIC PARTY: “UNFORTUNATELY LEADERSHIP OVER THE PAST 20 YEARS IS HAVING TROUBLE PASSING THE BATON TO NEW FOLKS. THIS ISN’T REALLY EVEN IDEALOGICAL. WE AGREE ON 90% OF THE PLATFORM.” SAMANTHA: AFTER HIS ARREST IN MARCH, TRAINA HAS STAYED QUIET– THAT BRINGS US TO SATURDAY. HE IS THE CAMPAIGN MANAGER FOR TRENT NESMITH WHO IS RUNNING TO REPLACE RICK ALLEN AS THE DISTRICT 12 CONGRESSMAN, SO HE BOUGHT A TICKET TO THE WALT WILLIAM BREAKFAST IN HOPES TO REPRESENT NESMITH. JOE TRAINA/ DEMOCRATIC PARTY: “YOU HAVE A RESTRAINING ORDER AGAINST ME?” SAMANTHA: TRAINA WAS THEN ESCORTED OUT OF THE PARTY’S FUNCTION BECAUSE A MEMBER FILED A RESTRAING ORDER AGAINST HIM. TRENT NESMITH/ 12TH DISTRICT CONGRESSMAN CANDIDATE: “WE HAVE GOT THIS DIVIDE IN RICHMOND COUNTY THAT NEEDS TO BE ADDRESSED.” FRANCYS JOHNSON/ 12TH DISTRICT CONGRESSMAN CANDIDATE: “THIS IS A DEMOCRACY, AND I THINK ALL PEOPLE HAVE THE RIGHT TO PARTICIPATE IN IT. THAT IS ONE OF OUR MOST CHERISHED VALUES SHRINED IN THE FIRST AMENDMENT.” SAMANTHA: I REACHED OUT TO THE CHAIRMAN OF THE DISTRICT’S PARTY, THE VICE CHAIR AND THE PARTY MEMBER WHO TOOK OUT THE RESTRAINING ORDER AGAINST TRAINA– BUT I HAVE YET TO GET A RESPONSE. DUE TO THE NATURE OF THE RESTRAINING ORDER, BOTH HE AND THE PARTY MEMBER WILL HAVE A COURT HEARING.

Democratic Party Chair Resigns Under Pressure From Wolf


INSTAGRAM USING #CBS-3. AND ANOTHER NEWS WE ARE TRACKING THIS NOON PENNSYLVANIA DEMOCRATIC PARTY CHAIRMAN HAS RESIGNED AT REQUEST OF THE GOVERNOR TOM WOLF, HE FACED PRESSURE TO STEP DOWN AFTER MAKING COMMENTS TO THE COLUMNIST ABOUT THE PARTIES RESPONSE TOSS SEXUAL MISCONDUCT ALLEGATIONS AGAINST POLITICIANS N A STATEMENT HE SAID SOME OF HIS COMMENTS WERE TAKEN OUT OF CONTEXT AND SOME WERE INACCURATE BUT HE DID CONCEDE HE SHOULD HAVE SPOKEN MORE CLEARLY.

I Sent Fakes of Myself to Be on TV Around the World


hi I’m Lou the butler last year I got a fake restaurant in a shed to number one on TripAdvisor in London oh just the shed story didn’t seem to die it went on a world tour I’m filled simply brought in Brazilian TV little reenactment special Chinese TV came over to the shed and filmed me for two hours while people commented on it the shed was discussed in Singaporean Parliament in order to help them form new laws on fake news I’ve been endlessly contacted by media from all over the world asking for interviews it doesn’t matter where like the interview is from they asked me the exact same questions so I decided to send fake versions of myself on TV radio and in public for the next six weeks but can I go away with it people like put forward totally fake versions of themselves online nowadays anyway don’t they like you have a sexy you who’s on Instagram I’m like a funny you on Twitter so like why can’t I do that in real life if it works this can only be a good thing and it means that I can spend more time on nothing I’m gonna host auditions to find these like bettered versions of myself what we’re doing here is we’re trying to get at the tune of people who will be me at media events I want to find the genuinely best person to do it I believe you’ve seen the Shedd documentary right sure is the opening of the shed documentary much sure if you’ve seen it yup 40 million people listen to this and now I want to be the 40 million and first person to hear it the shed is the number-one rated restaurant in London you’ve got every foodie celebrity and blogger in the city trying to get a table but the problem is until now it didn’t exist I like getting to know the character and then becoming that character amazing yeah what’s the bet what’s your like favorite thing I like planned gangsters or serial killers I’ve kept a few things I have a little bit of like yeah real-life serial killers and things all that yeah they judge from work again I try to check that’s all good we’re gonna do a roleplay where I’ve just met you I’m like a producer I’ve brought you in and then I’ll realize you’re not me that’s not you no no yes so but you maybe change my hair a bit but it’s definitely me look you’ve got to be up we’ve gotta fill a slot in five minutes and you oh come on man let’s get it going I’m very famous only its peak places I am about hi I’m Ava Butler my place make you I mean I’m ever busy though I think someone’s gonna realize if I send a woman it’s up to you it burnt his audition wasn’t great but he looks really good he’s a hotter version of me he’s all over ha tried to again he was gonna be on BBC Radio 2 with Vanessa Feltz at 7 million people had more people than I’ve ever been in front of are you okay to take out your piercings and stuff as well never took air there you go so where did the idea come from so I was a few years ago I was working writing fake reviews for restaurants on very shed intellects 15 calls a day and I need to talk to you and Vanessa about a project on Monday not clean shoes it all started for fun I was taking I was taking the pitch I was having a laugh at the shed I’ve been living in the ship converted shirts for sure how is easy enough yeah this is so ridiculous like I’m gonna have like ex-girlfriends colleague everyone be like oh my god ooh be on radio – Wow like well done it’s not gonna be me good luck you nervous you also know but probably thinking we almost got ratted out sure that we but that shows that ID looks nothing like they comes up with a picture obviously when you’re signing up a registration page but eighteen screener there’s a picture definitely there’s something just about some on the radio that we need to listen to seven million people listening Luba joins me in the studio right now good afternoon nothing well it’s sort of started from from what’s working and writing fake reviews it doesn’t make a good review um I think it’s the most good review hmm why would you bother with this thank you so much interesting to meet you that’s me so I thought the whole thing had gone terribly but I couldn’t have been more wrong people were went on device and read the story we had a spike in website traffic because it done so well I sent him on Indian TV in fact getting it for the perspectives from Butler himself I get tons of likes from Indian fans on Facebook because he’s the hot a version of me the next thing that I get is an interview for like Bulgarian TV over Skype hello hi you can hear me I decided to go for this incredibly charming actor that’s just behind me back there but I didn’t want to leave any of its chance so I fed him the answers to the questions yeah well I tricked everyone I like to think of myself as Monet of fast I like to paint with nonsense The Washington Post did an article called me the Donald Trump of TripAdvisor I look I’ve got the same hair as them you know it’s just me who buy gas in it well the shadows in a hearing in their Parliament about like fake news great are you real am i real is anything real caught a body could a journalist this is misleads our strength it’ll provide enough sense that yeah I wrote a kind of template mystical Disney before she become anti everyone my us is any medical easy school they wanted to come into the studio but I’ve said nicely it’ll just be on the phone so five live we’re doing a stationwide special about like the morality of fake reviewing how would you feel about going on the BBC as me no this is about the brain given the fact you’ve got like a background in like anthropology and you were brilliant journalist absolutely he basically goes on a tour of Britain as me so while I was just stay around on my sofa the whole of Great Britain thinks that I’m a smart going the next thing that I get is an invitation to go on Australia’s biggest breakfast show so I decide to go for like the closest thing that I can find and that’s my own flesh and blood my brother this is by mile the most risky one we’ve done right just look good morning morning shower is the morning it’s that biggest biggest morning show in Australia you happy that we’re done here no okay you’ve actually been on the channel and met the people before you’ll be fine because the first they’re gonna see of you is like you scream do you think that it’s going to work no so my brother was about to be interviewed in the same studio with the same presenters on the same show in front of like the biggest audience in Australia and we had done no preparation he did his first or the interview with us last December yeah absolutely they were all absolute nonsense were just barely so good an uber Butler joins us once again from London good morning to it was actually last year that you infiltrated Fashion Week but why did you go back to the designer of piane jeans recently I guess I wanted more people to hear the story what do you hope that people take out of what you’ve done now with the fashion world the identity fluidity that the Internet has brought us I’m not even the same person I was a year ago there’s something fun there as well losing yourself in it we’ve a delight to talk to you again thank you so much for being with us thank you for me my team of ubers represented me to millions of people from all over the world I’ve got follow-up interviews tons of new fans opportunities but they literally did a better job at me than I could ever imagine nice so now they’d put like all the hard work in I could sit back and reap the benefits I got nominated for a prestigious award for journalists content creator of the year [Music] [Music] not only was this dumb idea possible ie optimized me as a brand thank you so much for this award I really enjoy it thank you so much if I can some fakes to represent them why can’t everyone else [Music] ever feel like you’re not quite making the most of your life whether it’s during that big presentation or the morning after the night before but you can always find an uber uber is the world’s first service which enables you to order a look-alike of himself you can step into your life and optimize it [Music] [Applause] [Music] wanna impress your date [Music] vivid up high [Music] that DJ set becoming a train wreck uber car [Music] designated driver had one too many you know what to do [Music] [Applause] [Music] uber car optimize your identity it’s a creator of the year what happened and I said I took over here thank you no no no that’s for my mom yeah you can have it oh no no no you’re not allowed it

Why Be Catholic and Not Just Christian?


Hi, my name’s Fr. Mike Schmitz and this is Ascension Presents. I get asked a lot of times, “Father, so you’re Catholic, right?” and I go, “Yeah, I am.” They say: so what’s the difference, what’s the main difference between, like, the Catholic Church, and any of the other Protestant denominations or non-Catholic churches. Maybe it would be this, maybe it would be authority. And I know that’s a bad word, many of us we don’t like it, we’re like, blah, authority! That doesn’t sit right with me. What do you mean “authority”? I would say this: That the Church has the ability to teach us. They teach authoritatively. The Church has the ability to teach us in the name of Jesus, in the power of the Holy Spirit, in the glory of God the Father, that the Church has the ability to tell us, this is true, and this is not true; that the Church has the ability to establish doctrine. And I’m not talking about some invisible kind of like universal body of believers. I’m talking about the Church that Jesus himself founded back in Matthew chapter 16. Jesus looks at Simon and says, “Simon, your name is now Peter, ‘rock’. And upon this rock I will build my church, and the gates of hell will not prevail against it.” He goes on to say: “I will give you the keys to the kingdom of heaven.” Now, here’s the interesting thing that you may or may not know. Jesus came to establish the kingdom, right? But it’s not an invisible kingdom. Why? Because we can look at Jesus, as the king, establishes the kingdom, but when He says to Peter, you know, Simon, now Peter, he says “I give you the keys to the kingdom etc. etc.” He’s referencing Isaiah, the book of the Prophet Isaiah. And in Isaiah, there’s this role, in the kingdom there’s a role, there’s the king obviously, but there’s also the prime minister, the one who is the overseer. And when the king is gone, this person is in charge, this person has the authority of the king. It says that in Isaiah chapter 22. And it’s almost word for word what Jesus gives to Peter. The keys to the kingdom of heaven. He gives the Church a visible structure, and an actual hierarchy. And he says you can actually teach now, teach in my name, the Holy Spirit will lead you to all truth to be able to teach in my name. And this is exactly what happens. In the Acts of the Apostles chapter 15, they’re this big crisis, and the crisis is, the apostles had been evangelizing the Jews. So, basically they were all Jews. And they realised, Jesus is the fulfilment of Judaism, Jesus is the Messiah we were waiting for. So they’re sharing the good news with Jewish people. It was awesome. But then they realised, because Peter had a vision, and Paul was called to do this too, that they were called to bring the Gospel to non-Jews. Which is amazing and good because I am a non-Jew, and I get to be brought in, right? To the people of God. The question came up, OK, so when you evangelize Jews all you need to get is baptized because, they’re already circumcised. They’re already in the Old Covenant. So in order to be brought into the fulfilment of the Covenant, the New Covenant, they just have to be baptised. But if you’re evangelizing Gentiles, question, do they first have to be circumcised, and then be baptized? Or can they just be baptised? Now you can see at least two ways why this would be a very important question. One is if you were an adult Gentile man this would kind of be a big question he would want answered, ‘do I have to do this? Or is this kinda optional?’ You want that resolved ahead of time. But secondly, even more importantly, if I need to get circumcised in order to get baptised, and I’m not, that means I’m not saved. Like, “Do we have to do this in order to be saved?” is the big question. The problem is, Jesus never taught about that, and the Bible never teaches about this. And this is the problem, the problem with a thing called “Sola Scriptura'” or “Bible Alone”. You know, one of the pillars of the Reformation was this idea that “Bible Alone” or “Scripture Alone” you don’t need the church you only need “Bible Alone”. What about when the Bible doesn’t teach something? What do we do? Well, what happened was in Acts chapter 15 the apostles came together and again I’m not saying some loose kind of invisible church, but the actual structure of the Church. Those apostles, the people that Jesus himself called, Peter as the pope, Paul and Barnabas, to have this body of the Church. And the Church gets together, and they discuss, and they debate, and they pray, and then they decided. They said, “it seems to the Holy Spirit, and to us, that we should not impose this on Gentiles, they do not have to be circumcised in order to be baptized.” And, in that moment you can see in the Bible that the Church, again, the visible Church, the structure of the Church, governance of the Church has the ability to teach. And not just to teach, but to teach definitively, not merely optionally. And if you’re a student of history, you see that this is not the only time, in fact the Church has to do this again and again and again, because people pick up the Old Testament and they pick up the New Testament Scriptures, which also the Church gave us. Another video by the way. And they say, “Well I’ve come to the conclusion that Jesus isn’t really God … I mean he’s clearly God. I mean he came to earth, he rose from the dead, he’s clearly God. I think he only looked like human.” And that was a heresy called Docetism, in fact it was one of the earliest heresies, was that Jesus was fully God, but he wasn’t fully man. In the Church, again not this generic, invisible Church, but the actual, physical, structure or hierachy of the Church said, “That’s incorrect.” Then other people came along and said, well he’s fully human but maybe he’s only partly God, like ‘quasi’ God like the Aryans. And the Church came together at the Council of Nicaea 325 (A.D.) and they said, “No, Jesus is fully God, and fully man.” Two natures, human and divine, in one divine person. Now, every Christian in the world believes that. Why? Because in some way, whether they admit it or not, every single Christian in the world believes that the Catholic Church has the authority to teach. Every Christian who believes in the Trinity, that God is Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, co-equal, co-eternal that no one is greater than the other believes that, because of the authority of the Catholic Church. Because the Church came together at the Council of Nicaea, the Council of Constantinople, and all the other Church Councils, and declared this. That this is the interpretation of the text. And we need that, here’s the crazy thing, we need that so badly, OK, here’s a little mental exercise. Imagine that you are God, for some of you this will not be the first time today that you did this. And it is so important to you, that the people you created know who you truly are, that they don’t get you wrong. So what do you do? Well, you don’t want to overwhelm them with your beauty and power and glory and truth because then they might have to serve you out of fear. You want them to fall in love with you, and you want them to know who you truly are. So you start small, you start with this guy named Abraham, or Abram, you know he changed his name to Abraham. You bring him slowly and slowly and then his family, you reveal yourself slowly to his family and then to his tribe, and then to his people, you call the Jewish people, the chosen people of God and you slowly reveal yourself to them and very carefully, because you don’t want them to get any part of you wrong. And then in the fullness of time 2,000 years ago, you yourself actually become one of them. You become a human being. And in that, you reveal who you truly are, and you don’t do it as the most powerful one, or as the greatest one, or as the richest one, you take the lowest place as a humble, poor person. And you die as a criminal. You let yourself be overwhelmed by suffering and death. Why? Because it’s so important to you as God that people know the truth and depth of your heart. Then you rise from the dead, you send your Holy Spirit to the apostles and then they write down all these things. And, while they’re writing these things down, you preserve it. Why? Because it’s very important to you as God that they write down exactly what you want them to write down, and no more and no less. And then, over the course of years, as they’re translating it, as they’re copying it you, by your Holy Spirit you guide that copying, you guide that translating, so that they don’t get you wrong. Why? Because it’s very important to you as God that no one gets you wrong. Here’s this infallible book, right? It’s a book that has, it’s without error. Now, it’s not without scientific error, because it’s not a scientific book, it’s a book of poetry, it’s a book of truth, it’s a book of goodness. (There’s a whole other video about that). The point is, you compile this infallible book through fallible people. But you compile this infallible book, now, if you were God, would it make any sense for you to then say, “OK” to anyone, “Here’s this infallible book, boom, take it, read it, tell me what you think.” No you wouldn’t. Why? Because an infallible book, without an infallible interpreter, is a worthless book. Right? The Bible is infallible, but without an infallible interpreter it’s like, that’s why you have 30,000+ denominations of Christianity in the United States. Because, you know, someone picks it up and says, ‘Oh, here’s what I think.’ someone else picks it up, ‘no no no, here’s what I think.’ That’s one of the reasons why G.K. Chesterton back in the day he had said, while he was Catholic, they said he said: Because I don’t need a church who can tell me when I’m right, I need a Church that will tell me where I’m wrong. So if you ask, you know what’s the big difference between the Catholic Church and all the non-Catholic Christian denominations?’ I’d say, when it comes down to it, I think what it comes down to is right there. Authority. From all of us here at Ascension Presents, my name’s Fr. Mike. God bless.