The Very Radical Politics Of Dolly Parton’s ‘9 to 5’


When you hear that opening to the 1980 Dolly Parton hit, you naturally start preparing yourself for what’s coming next – ♪ Working 9 to 5, what a way to make a living ♪ ♪ Barely getting by, it’s all taking and no giving ♪ That may seem like a weird characterization of an Academy Award-nominated song by a woman who’s been dubbed the queen of qountry – a national treasure, who’s been nominated for 47 Grammys, won over 150 awards, has composed over 3,000 songs, a broadway musical and she’s released 64 studio albums. And a woman who has said for years that she modeled her look after the so-called town tramp. The people they called trash – in my home town, here in Sevier county, the loose women, well that was the women that I thought were, were, beautiful. So, I’ve been at it all my life trying to be gaudy. But when you start to break
‘9 to 5’ down lyric-by-lyric, by the end, you’re almost expecting
Parton to call for the overthrowing of the bourgeois in her
sweet Appalachian tones. It’s such a perfect embodiment
of the radical labor movements that were taking place in the United States
throughout the 1960s and 70s. But the song is also an unintentional
melody of the sort of radical politic that Dolly Parton, herself,
represents in her life and work. ♪♪ Dolly Parton is an American icon. Her look, her sound, her whole damn existence. Now that I’ve made it,
no matter how hard it gets, I’m not about to b*tch about it now. She was born in a small town in Tennessee, in a small log cabin, one of 12 kids. We had a roof over our head, I always say, even if it did leak. We had something to eat on our table, even if it wasn’t exactly what we wanted. We had a bed to sleep in,
even if there was a bunch of us in it. She started singing at the age of 10, but her career really launched in 1967 when she became a regular
on the Porter Wagoner show. Right now I want to call out a little gal here that her and I have had a lot of
luck with a couple single records- I haven’t called you out yet,
wait just a minute there, kiddo. Within a few years, she became the
queen of country, with hits like ♪ He said you can just call me Joshua ♪ ♪♪ ♪ Jolene, Jolene, Jolene, Jolene … ♪ ♪ And I will always love you ♪ I wanted more than to,
just be a farmer’s daughter, even though I’m proud to be.
I just wanted pretty things, I wanted money to buy things that I had
always been impressed with as a child. But, at the foundation of what makes
her iconic is how Parton stands as both a rebuke to and embrace of
the expectations of a woman from the poverty-stricken foothills of Appalachia. We were a very proud people,
people with a lot of class. It was country class
but it was a great deal of class, and most of my people were not that
educated but they are very very intelligent. Good common sense,
‘horse sense’ we called it. And while Parton herself stays
away from talking politics, her own life has been a testament
to how she has stood with people. I don’t care what – whether it’s your race, or whether you’re green, blue,
black, red, or alien grey, or whether you’re male or female, or transgender. If you do work, you should be
paid and appreciated for it, and you should be respected and
appreciated for who and what you are. She makes people feel good about
who they are, whether they’re an evangelical Christian or gay drag queen, or both of those things combined, right? Dolly represents, she’s their avatar.
She’s somebody who can be someone’s icon. And to fully understand Parton as
that kind of radical everyperson icon, we have to look at ‘9 to 5’ –
the film, the song, and the album. ‘9 to 5’ was the title song for
an office revenge comedy with the same name, and it starred
Jane Fonda, Lily Tomlin, Dolly Parton. The premise of the film is pretty
straight-forward: These three women work for this guy. He’s rude, lies, gives opportunities earned
by women to less-deserving men, and he genuinely seems to believe
that sexual harassment is as necessary as his morning coffee. Mr. Hart I’ve told you before,
I’m a married woman! And I’m a married man.
That’s what makes it so perfect. Oh Mr. Hart… [screams] – Look I want you.
– Oh for heaven’s sake! What are you doing? Mr. Hart! Call me Frank. One day, during a particularly
inspired weed-smoking sesh, the three women relish in fantasies
about how they’d like to exact revenge. And a series of events lead them to,
eventually, kidnapping him. ♪♪ While they’ve held him hostage,
the women take over the office and start enacting a series of reforms –
like equal pay between men and women, better work hours, even an in-house
daycare for parent employees. The movie ends with a
happy ending for the ladies, and the boss gets what he deserves – abducted by the Indigenous of the Amazon.
Because, why not? Now, again, on a superficial level
the movie comes across as your run-of-the-mill cute office comedy. But it was released in 1980 –
a year that ended the decade of one of the most militant and successful
eras for labor and women’s rights. Throughout the late 60s and 70s, the United States experienced
a labor upheaval. Hard-earned union rights
were being rolled back, and workers across industries
pushed right back. From postal employees to California’s
Cesar Chavez and the United Farm Workers, to the coal miners of
Harlan Country, Kentucky, workers were shutting down their industries
to demand rights and protect their unions. And right alongside, if not within,
these movements, there were civil rights and women’s
rights groups also pushing for economic and protective
equality in the workplace. Think, for example, the 1980
clarification that under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, that sexual harassment was,
in fact, totally illegal. So, it’s in that context that
the film ‘9 to 5′ comes out – it mixes two of the largest movements
of the previous 20 years and uses comedy to make a
radical point about workers’ rights and sexual harassment in a way
that’s palatable and not preachy. I mean, think of it this way: Three female
workers, feeling detached from their labor and suffering abuse from
their boss, overthrow him and introduce reforms that benefit both
men and women equally. The film may as well be called: Now, that’s the film –
what about Parton’s song? In the same way the film
“9 to 5” is a worker’s homage to her sweat and toil
as well as her revolt, the song ‘9 to 5’ is her
lament, but also her hope. This chorus – catchy and relatable – actually does a pretty good job of summing up philosopher Karl Marx’s theory of worker alienation, which is a huge part of his overall critique of capitalism, and not something you’d expect from a catchy pop country song. According to Marx, because workers
don’t control the work that they do – in any real sense –
their lives lose a sense of purpose because they become, in that
process, commodities themselves. They’re just a means to an end,
the end being profit for the Boss. In the song ‘9 to 5,’ Parton
makes this alienation pretty clear with lyrics like, ‘Yawn and
stretch and try to come to life,’ ‘They use your mind,
but they never give you credit,’ ‘barely gettin’ by,
it’s all takin’ and no givin,’ ‘you’re just a step on the
boss-man’s ladder.’ But, when you take that song
and hold it next to the film ‘9 to 5,’ the song becomes a radical critique. But there’s more. Parton released the song on her
24th studio album, entitled 9 to 5 and Odd Jobs. This album, filled with original songs and covers, captures Parton’s working class sympathies and experiences, sometimes in a surprising way. It takes a hard look at the
class struggle in America. Songs like ‘Deportee,’
songs about coal miners, songs about being poor in a small town, songs about rural poverty. Take, for example, ‘Poor Folks Town,’
an original song on the album. And another original,
‘Sing for the Common Man.’ Then there’s ‘Deportee,’ it’s a cover
of proud communist Woody Guthrie’s protest song about a
group of Mexican workers who were killed in a plane crash
over Los Gatos, California in 1948. And in media coverage, they were
simply referred to as ‘deportees.’ Each song in the album illustrates a
different aspect of working-class America, and, together, they create perhaps
Dolly Parton’s most provocative, definitely most radical, homage
to the everyday person. She’s someone who understands
what it’s like to be hungry, to be without electricity, to be
lacking in basic needs and resources. I think it gives her songwriting,
and for that matter her philanthropy, a great sense of empathy. But Parton has notoriously
stayed away from getting political. She’s actually got a pretty good swerve. Where do you stand on this election? Right now, I just – I just don’t know. It’s just the greatest show
on television right now. That, however, hasn’t stopped her
from pushing policies in her own way. Take, for example, two of
her biggest philanthropic efforts: the Imagination Library
and the My People Fund. The Imagination Library is a charitable
effort that Dolly started originally in her home county that
gives books to young children to encourage them to read. It’s since expanded into several
countries, across many states, and become one of the largest
children’s literacy programs in the world. To date, the Imagination Library has
given out 100 million free books to kids all over the United States. The My People Fund provided $1,000 a month for six months, with a final check of $5,000, to 1,300 families who
had had lost everything in the 2016 Tennessee wildfires. I know it’s been a trying time for my people and this assistance will help. She gave this money to the residents of
her hometown with no strings attached, didn’t tell them how to spend it,
understanding that they would have the agency and the knowledge
to do what they needed to recover. In the end, the Dolly Foundation would
give over $8 million to impacted families. Nobody but you would
be so kind and generous. I’m sure anybody up here would
do that. These are good people. And that’s what Dolly Parton
as a radical icon comes down to: Someone who believes that
people are fundamentally good and that they deserve good. Alright, how many of you guys actually
thought you’d spend some time watching a video about how
Dolly Parton is a Marxist icon? You’re welcome! Let us know what you guys thought.
Also let us know what else you want us to cover in future
episodes of Pop Americana. And we’ll see you next week. ♪♪

Has political Islam failed? | Head to Head


The Arab Spring shook the foundations of the Middle East Across the region millions went on to elect not secular but islamic leaders In Egypt however the Muslim Brotherhood, were confronted by mass protests and ousted by the army So can political Islam, or Islamism, work in a democracy? Im Mehdi Hassan, and I’ve come here to the Oxford Union to go Head to Head with Professor Tariq Ramadan Whose grandfather foundede the muslim brotherhood Rank by time magazine as one of the hundred most influential people on Earth His call for the reform within the Islamic world has triggered both widespread support and outrage. from both muslims and non muslims alike.

Iranian In L.A.: More Than Just A Stereotype [Becoming Iranian-American, Pt. 2] | AJ+


“First off, I want to know how you guys identify yourselves.” “How do you identify?” “Depends if we’re at TSA or not.” Hi, I’m Yara. In episode 1 of this series, I explored a slice of Iran in Los Angeles, also known as “Tehrangeles.” But now, I want to see how young Iranian-Americans are breaking down the stereotypes and assumptions a lot of other people might have about us. There’s a certain stereotype about Iranian-Americans, especially those in Los Angeles. “White BMW.” That they’re rich, shallow and made for reality TV. “Ohhhhh, like a Persian.” But I personally don’t relate to those depictions at all. I’m definitely not flashy. I mean, I wear the same pair of black pants every single day. But I do change my socks. And many young Iranian-Americans don’t relate to these stereotypes, either. Like Alex Shams, who grew up in L.A. He showed me a side of the Iranian-American community here that you don’t see on TV. And, surprise, he doesn’t have any gold chains or drive a white BMW. “We are in downtown Los Angeles, in the jewelry district. So there’s a lot of gold shops everywhere around us, and jewelry shops of all kinds, with a lot of Iranians working around here.” Alex showed me how Tehrangeles extends far beyond its symbolic center in Westwood, and into downtown L.A.’s jewelry and garment districts. “Many Iranian merchants here, in the valley and many other places, they end up learning Spanish because most of their clients, for example, are Spanish-speaking.” “Oh my god.” “I just want to hear a mixture of both: “I found two Iranians who speak Spanish!” “What do people misunderstand about the Iranian community in L.A.?” “I think there’s a certain image that many people outside of Los Angeles have of Iranians, particularly because of shows like Shahs of Sunset which show this kind of really particular Westwood, rich Beverly Hills, L.A. Iranian that I think is definitely a part of the community, it’s definitely a part of what’s happening, but it’s so much more diverse than that. Both in terms of the neighborhoods that Iranians live in across the city, and the kinds of jobs they’re doing, the kind of lifestyles they have, socio-economically.” Alex is right. There are wealthy and working-class Iranians. Secular and religious Iranians. Muslim, Christian, Jewish, Zoroastrian and Baha’i Iranians. Just about every kind of Iranian you can think of lives in L.A. Including some incredible artists and musicians. “Sometimes I’ll hear a melody, and it’ll be a melody that needs voice, but it won’t sound good in English. So it needs to have Farsi words on it. Because the Persian language is so sweet and melodic.” This is Chloe Pourmorady. She’s an Iranian-American Jewish musician who’s never been to Iran, but she’s fully in touch with her Iranian – or Persian – identity. “I feel so, so blessed to have been brought up here, because I think this is the closest place outside of Iran that you can get to Iran. If you want to really immerse yourself in Persian culture, you can do that very easily in Los Angeles. People call me American, but it’s still something in my heart that doesn’t resonate so much. I feel in my heart the Persian is first.” “Does your Jewish faith incorporate itself into your music?” “Spiritually it does. I sometimes use text from the Torah. Very beautiful, very poetic texts, much like you would find in poetry of Rumi or Hafez or something like this.” Chloe’s music is unlike anything I’ve ever heard. It’s part Persian, Jewish, Turkish, Greek and Balkan. “I remember I had a composition professor. He found out I was both Iranian and Jewish, he was very startled. He said, ‘You’re Jewish? I thought you were Iranian,’ not thinking that it’s possible to be both. Which it totally is.” The Iranian Jewish community is a huge part of the Tehrangeles story. They’ve opened restaurants, …supermarkets… …and even pharmacies. And that’s just a small taste of how they’ve shaped L.A. It was obvious to me the “Shahs of Sunset” stereotype is really blown out of proportion. But there’s also another stereotype that young Iranian-Americans also have to grapple with. That of the dangerous, scary Middle Easterner. [screaming] “Our biggest threat is now Iran.” To talk about this, I caught up with Justin and Fatemeh Mashouf, an Iranian-American couple who are also practicing Muslims. “Oh yeah, by the way, so Justin breakdances.” Justin is half-Iranian, and in 2007 he traveled to Iran to make a documentary about breakdancing. It was his way of trying to bridge the gap between Iran and the United States. “Coming back to the U.S., I was interrogated at Homeland Security, and all of the footage that I had shot in Iran was confiscated from me. And I had to do multiple, extensive interviews with the FBI in order to regain the footage. It was a huge kind of blow, I think, to my own sense of feeling, being an American because, all of a sudden, it was like, ‘What the hell are you doing? You’re treating me like a terrorist.’” Iranian-Americans and other Middle Easterners are marked as “white” by the U.S. government. But a lot of us don’t agree with being labeled that way. Many like Justin have grown up with constant reminders that they are not white, especially after 9/11 and the “War on Terror.” “College applications, job applications, Iranian-Americans are confronted with this question, ‘What race are you?’” “Even though I know I’m technically supposed to check ‘white,’ no, I’m not going to.” “My whole life, I’ve always just put ‘other,’ and then put, you know, ‘Iranian-American.’ Even though people would see me as, like, ‘Whatever, you’re white, just put the Caucasian box.’ I would just, I would always say I’m biracial.” “In the Iranian-American community, what is it like being, kind of, I guess I can say a devout or a practicing Muslim?” “I grew up in a Muslim household where, amidst all my cousins and aunts and uncles, we were the most Muslim of them. So I constantly had this struggle to figure out, like, well, how Muslim do I want to be?” While most Iranians have a Muslim background, those in L.A. are predominantly secular. So life as a practicing Muslim here can sometimes be difficult. “If I’m going to wear hijab, it really creates a bind for me to be able to connect with Iranians. For the first time, with the travel ban, I feel like Iranians are kind of coming together and saying no – as a people, we stand up and say that this is wrong.” “We named him after he was born. We decided for Sajjad Ali. And it became very important for us that just because he can pass off as white, because he is three-quarters Persian, and because we want him to identify as Muslim, that his name precedes all of that.” There was one more thing I had to do while I was in L.A.: get some amazing Iranian food. Alex recommended a place called It’s All Good House of Kabob, a restaurant you’d only find in Tehrangeles. Just look at the walls. This is the only place in America I’ve seen serve Isfahani biryani. It’s kind of like a really flavorful Iranian lamb burger with lots of herbs and spices. “This is what happens when you try to eat for a camera.” “Was there ever a moment in your life when you became more aware of your, sort of, Iranian identity?” “When the U.S. invaded Iraq, I was at a school where there were actually no Iranians. People would call me ‘Saddam Hussein’ and ‘Osama bin Laden’ in the halls.” “Oh my god.” “The difference between an Iraqi, an Afghan, an Iranian or anything else didn’t really matter. There was a kind of hatred towards Muslims, towards people who look Muslim.” “I very much wanted to blend in, I didn’t want to look different. I mean, obviously I had these eyebrows and these facial features. Interestingly enough, yeah, the mustache just came out very quickly, I should say.” “Hair developing quickly is a big theme with Iranians, I think. It’s the moment when you realize there’s something different about you. That’s when your whiteness suddenly falls apart.” “Here’s the big question. Persian or Iranian or Iranian-American or something else?” “I prefer to identify myself as Iranian, and often I specify Iranian from Los Angeles because I really do feel like the fact that I’m from Los Angeles adds a certain dimension to my Iranian-ness that for me is like powerful. This combination of people, this diversity that exists in Los Angeles, I think, has really shaped how I think about being Iranian.” Talking to young Iranian-Americans in L.A., I’ve realized something: Despite all the stereotypes and discrimination, a lot of us are actually embracing our Iranian-ness. It made me think about my own dual identity, as someone who didn’t grow up in Tehrangeles. I wanted to talk to my family about what they went through. And how that’s helped me become my own version of Iranian-American. So we’ve given you a little taste of L.A.’s Iranian community in the past two episodes, but the truth is, there’s little pockets of Tehrangeles all over southern California — in Glendale, Irvine, Palos Verdes — everywhere. In the next episode, though, we’re heading back to northern California to interview my own parents. Don’t forget to subscribe for more stories from Untold America.

The Cannibal Warlords of Liberia (Full Length Documentary)


SHANE SMITH: So is that
why your nickname was General Butt Naked? SHANE SMITH: A lot of people
would drink or do drugs before fighting? SHANE SMITH: Yeah. SHANE SMITH: So you
killed the child? JOSHUA BLAHYI: Yes. SHANE SMITH: And then
you drank the blood? JOSHUA BLAHYI: Yeah. MALE SPEAKER :
[SPEAKING FOREIGN LANGUAGE] CROWD:
[SPEAKING FOREIGN LANGUAGE] MALE SPEAKER 1 : So what
kind of war is this? Guerrilla? MALE SPEAKER 2 :
World War III. SHANE SMITH: We here at Vice
have been fascinated by Liberia for a long time. It’s America’s first
and only foray into quasi-colonialism in Africa. It started as a back-to-Africa
movement for freed slaves and, in fact, their constitution
was written in Washington. And Monrovia, the capital city
of Liberia, is actually named after President Monroe. It became a state
in the 1840s. So the freed slaves go back to
Africa and promptly enslave the native Africans based on the
plantation method they had learned in the US, which lasts
for about 140 years, until Samuel K. Doe, the first native
African-born Liberian, was elected. But this doesn’t
last very long. Why? Because an American-educated– and some would say
American-backed– rebel leader named Charles
Taylor and his buddy, Prince Johnson, came from America
and overthrew him. MALE SPEAKER:
[SPEAKING FOREIGN LANGUAGE] MALE REPORTER : Despite reports
that the government wants talks with the rebels,
the violence goes on. FEMALE REPORTER : Rebel forces
stormed into the center of the capital today. They are now less than a mile
from the executive mansion where President Samuel Doe has
barricaded himself with about 500 soldiers. SHANE SMITH: In fact, Prince
Johnson had got to Doe before his buddy Charles, ended up
torturing him, cutting him up, and is rumored to have
eaten him while filming the whole thing. [SHOUTING] SHANE SMITH: So Charles Taylor
finally gets elected with a campaign slogan that reads, “He
killed my ma, he killed my pa, but I’ll still vote
for him.” And it works, he gets elected. But he’s so corrupt that soon
after, there’s a bunch of warlords fighting for control
over Liberia, the country devolves into civil war, and
things go from bad to severely fucked up. SHANE SMITH : But this is like
a civil war on steroids. It’s a post-apocalyptic
Armageddon with child soldiers smoking heroin, cross-dressing
cannibals, systematic rape– it’s total hell on earth. [GUNFIRE] MALE SPEAKER:
[SPEAKING FOREIGN LANGUAGE] MALE SPEAKER 1: We
love the music. There’s the music. MALE SPEAKER 2 : They call
it the sound of death. MALE SPEAKER 1: Yeah, but it’s
the sound of music to us. SHANE SMITH: Liberia’s been in
the news a lot lately because Charles Taylor is on trial at
The Hague for war crimes. But we wanted to know what
happened to all the other warlords, so we contacted a
Canadian journalist who lives in Liberia named Myles Estey,
who’s kind of a Kurtz-like character– tall, skinny, skeleton guy who’s
had malaria more times than he’s had hot dinners. And he said he could get
us access to all these ex-warlords. So we said, great. We got on a plane, and
we flew to Liberia. [MUSIC – THE ALMIGHTY DEFENDERS,
“ALL MY LOVING”] SHANE SMITH : When you first
get to Monrovia, the first thing you think is,
it’s really hot. It’s really hot, it’s
really poor, and it’s totally chaotic. In fact, when we went to pick
up Myles, he had just gotten out the hospital with malaria. He gets in the car, and he says,
are you ready to go? We’re going to Baboon Town in
the red light district to meet our first general, General
bin Laden. So as we drove to Baboon Town,
we asked Myles what’s up with the name, “General bin Laden?”
And he said, well, a lot of the generals took different
names because they didn’t want to be identified after the
various wars, and these pseudonyms were meant to strike
terror into the hearts of their enemies. So there’s a General Rambo,
because he’s scary, there was a General Mosquito, because
mosquitoes are terrifying because they bring malaria. The general that fought General
Mosquito was named General Mosquito Spray. And of course, there’s
General bin Laden. In fact, there’s two
General bin Ladens. Our General bin Laden, we found
out en route, had just been put in jail. Now, he didn’t know why, but
he suspected because the authorities found out that
we were coming with cameras to shoot him. MYLES ESTEY: And they say
they’re not gonna let him out, but we can interview him in the
jail and we can interview the commanders. SHANE SMITH : Let’s do that. Let’s go then. MYLES ESTEY: Yeah. SHANE SMITH : So the minute we
arrive in Baboon Town, our car is surrounded by a bunch
of sketchy dudes. So when Myles came back and said
we could interview bin Laden in the police station, I
was like, yeah, let’s get out of here and get in there
really quick. So we get into the police
station, and it’s chaos. Some guards are saying you can
go see him, other guards are saying you can’t go see him,
and we just have to sit there and wait. SHANE SMITH: I like being
in the police station. It’s nice. [MONKEY SCREECHING] SHANE SMITH: Monkey. Little monkey. He’s got herpes, I think,
or something. Hi. What’s wrong with the monkey? Why is the monkey here? SHANE SMITH: Why is
the monkey here? [MONKEY SCREECHES] SHANE SMITH: We’re in a police
station in the middle of the red light district to meet
General bin Laden, and I’m wondering why the
monkey’s here. [SHANE SMITH SIGHS] SHANE SMITH : Then eventually,
after sitting there for a while, we realized, oh, we’ve
got to grease some palms. So we gave them some money and
bang– we were back into the jail and we could talk
to bin Laden. Hey, bin Laden? GENERAL BIN LADEN : Yeah? SHANE SMITH : How are you? MYLES ESTEY : This is
my friend, Shane. SHANE SMITH : Shane. GENERAL BIN LADEN: [INAUDIBLE]. Yeah. SHANE SMITH: Nice to meet you. We’re gonna try to get you
out of here now, and then we can go back. SHANE SMITH: All right. We’re gonna do it right now. GENERAL BIN LADEN: Now. SHANE SMITH: OK. MYLES ESTEY: Yeah, I
know what he did. We’re talking about to get him
out, what do we have to do? MYLES ESTEY: To who? MALE SPEAKER : OK, we’ll stop. We’ll stop. SHANE SMITH : Video’s off. OFFICER : –without
the permission. MALE SPEAKER : It’s off. SHANE SMITH : The video’s off. He’s carrying– he’s just
holding it right now. MYLES ESTEY : Look,
we’re good people. We’re good– nobody’s recording anything. MYLES ESTEY : Sure, I can
give him cash and– can we pay him and
pay you a fine? And then take him? OFFICER : Fine. MYLES ESTEY : OK, great. OFFICER : That’s good. MYLES ESTEY : OK. SHANE SMITH : OK, let’s go,
let’s go, let’s go. Let’s go, let’s go, let’s go. OK, let’s go, let’s go. MALE SPEAKER: Hey, yeah– you! SHANE SMITH: We went
in there– we’re being followed by
the police right now. SHANE SMITH: Yeah, we might
have to change tapes or do something, because– what we do is we shoot cars– MALE SPEAKER : Yeah, that’s– SHANE SMITH: –and if
they come, we can give them the tape. There’s nothing on the tape. SHANE SMITH: Yeah. We do, right now. GENERAL BIN LADEN: We’ll
go to my warehouse. SHANE SMITH: OK. GENERAL BIN LADEN: Don’t
worry about that. SHANE SMITH: Our trip is getting
progressively heavier. SHANE SMITH: Yeah,
that’ll be good. GENERAL BIN LADEN: We’re going
on top of the building. SHANE SMITH: OK. I’m kind of a little bit worried
that the police are gonna come get us right now. I gave them a fake name
and fake number. SHANE SMITH: OK, nice
to meet you. SHANE SMITH: Nice to meet you. SHANE SMITH: Thank you. Thank you. So after we got bin Laden out
of jail, he was very excited to get us up to his rooftop
and tell us his story. And according to him, the
ex-generals, who are now the community leaders, are the only
ones doing anything to help the people. SHANE SMITH: So maybe you could
explain a little bit about– so first of all, you
became known as bin Laden during the war? GENERAL BIN LADEN:
During the war. SHANE SMITH: And then after the
war, now you’re sort of trying to help people by
carpentry and by karate. GENERAL BIN LADEN: Karate. SHANE SMITH: Do you get
any money here? SHANE SMITH: No, but the UN or
the government doesn’t give you any money? SHANE SMITH : Nothing? SHANE SMITH: And is this area–
this is red light here? GENERAL BIN LADEN:
It’s a red light. This is red light. SHANE SMITH: And is it– is there a lot of crime
in red light? MALE SPEAKER : Oh yeah. GENERAL BIN LADEN
: Yeah, it’s– this is red light. SHANE SMITH : Red light. SHANE SMITH : So Myles comes
over, stops the interview, and says, we have to get the
fuck out of here now. Bin Laden looks down and
he goes, yeah, yeah, those aren’t my guys. You guys should really go. SHANE SMITH : So bin Laden
gave us an escort, and a couple of his guys got us
through the crowd to the car, and we got the fuck out. SHANE SMITH : So let’s go. Let’s go, let’s go, let’s
go, let’s go. Holy fucking shit. That was out of hand. We gotta get out of here. There was some heavy duty
Libs there, boy. So after meeting and being
freaked out by General bin Laden, we wanted to see what
the UN and government were doing to rebuild Liberia. We met a local journalist named
Nagbe, and we asked him, and he said, you want to the
government and UN are doing? I’ll take you to West Point. West Point is the worst slum in
Liberia, which makes it one of the worst slums in West
Africa, which makes it one of the worst slums in the world. Now, when you first get there,
the first thing you want to do is get the hell out. It’s open sewers everywhere– shit, piss, garbage, everything
mixed in– and the stench is
overpowering. SHANE SMITH : Oh, dude. It really stinks here. SHANE SMITH : But, I mean, one
of the first basic rules is don’t shit where you eat. IMMANUEL NAGBE: That’s
it, but– SHANE SMITH: That’s
a number one rule. SHANE SMITH: But the government
has to do something about that. SHANE SMITH: Mm-hmm. So even in one of the worst
slums of Western Africa, you see the cultural impact that
America has there. All the kids are wearing Biggie
or Tupac t-shirts. In fact, one kid came up to us
and said, hey, I’m a rapper. Can I rap for you? And we said yes. And it wasn’t about bling, and
it wasn’t about Cristal. SHANE SMITH: And is there a
lot of malaria in here? SHANE SMITH : Needless to say,
in West Point, health conditions are foul. Disease is everywhere– malaria, infections, and
AIDS are rampant. SHANE SMITH : Cover
up for heroin. SHANE SMITH : Wow. IMMANUEL NAGBE: So
a big business. SHANE SMITH: We heard stories
that during the war, the rebels would go out in boats
with diamonds and trade the diamonds for weapons and
cocaine, and there was a lot of Colombians and Mexicans. SHANE SMITH: We find it
interesting because cocaine and heroin are very expensive
drugs, and so we were surprised to find heroin here. Usually in poorer countries,
there’s speed or meth or things you can make. SHANE SMITH: Why is that? [BABY CRYING] MALE SPEAKER:
[SPEAKING FOREIGN LANGUAGE] MALE SPEAKER : You got
to smoke this up. MALE SPEAKER :
[SPEAKING FOREIGN LANGUAGE] MALE SPEAKER :
[SPEAKING FOREIGN LANGUAGE] MALE SPEAKER :
[SPEAKING FOREIGN LANGUAGE] SHANE SMITH: Liberian
dollars or– IMMANUEL NAGBE: Liberian
dollars. SHANE SMITH: So how
much is that? SHANE SMITH : So because of the
poverty, a lot of women have to become prostitutes? IMMANUEL NAGBE: Yes. SHANE SMITH: Sex worker. IMMANUEL NAGBE: We
can go this way. SHANE SMITH: No, you can
just show it to us. SHANE SMITH : The legacy of
civil war in Liberia is staggering. It’s the fourth-poorest
country in the world. 50% of the country is
illiterate, 70% of the female population has been raped,
80% of the population is unemployed, and a large
percentage of the population has eaten human flesh. MALE SPEAKER: It tastes
like real meat. If you taste it, you’d like
to eat it every day. You want to see some piece? SHANE SMITH : Now one of the
warlords responsible for these atrocities, who fought in all
three civil wars, is a guy named General Rambo, who we
picked up at a market. He said, I’ll talk to you if
you take me to the old headquarters of the rebel
factions outside of town. SHANE SMITH : When did the
hotel stop working? SHANE SMITH : Because
of the war. GENERAL RAMBO : When
the war came. SHANE SMITH : Yeah. SHANE SMITH : Yeah. GENERAL RAMBO: Yes,
it happened. SHANE SMITH: So you were one
of the ones that came in to take out Taylor? GENERAL RAMBO: Yes. SHANE SMITH : And then, at one
point, the American government came to try to get you
to go to Iraq? SHANE SMITH: Yeah. SHANE SMITH: American. SHANE SMITH : Yeah. And so when there was Iraq,
it was like, OK, let’s go. We can help. So what happened? SHANE SMITH : The government
wouldn’t let you go? SHANE SMITH: Do you think it’s
a problem that you have all these ex-combatants who grew
up fighting– you fought in three wars– they have no money, they
have no job, and isn’t that a problem? GENERAL RAMBO: It’s
a big problem. SHANE SMITH: So they’re still
there with the guns? GENERAL RAMBO: Yeah, they’re
still there with the guns. The war is hot. SHANE SMITH : So if the rebel
forces wanted, they could take over tomorrow? SHANE SMITH: Two
or three hours? GENERAL RAMBO: Sure. SHANE SMITH: Wow. SHANE SMITH : And do
you think there’s a possibility of that happening? GENERAL RAMBO: Yes. SHANE SMITH : So what Rambo is
saying is, there’s still plenty of guns in Liberia, and
him, or someone like him, can take over Monrovia in two hours
if the UN leaves, and the UN is scheduled to
leave next year. And as we said our goodbyes to
Rambo, we told him we were going back to West Point. SHANE SMITH : Yeah? SHANE SMITH: Cannibalism,
chaos, killing, rape, everything. GENERAL RAMBO : Everything. SHANE SMITH : A few years ago,
we did an article in Vice Magazine called “General Butt
Naked Versus the Tupac Army,” about a particularly fierce
Liberian warlord called Butt Naked who fought naked, his
child soldiers fought naked, and they were cannibals. So we asked Rambo if he knew him
by chance, and he said, in fact, we’re from the same
tribe, I know him well. He promised to set up an
interview while we did our follow-up in the brothels
of West Point. [CAR HONKING] SHANE SMITH: Driving
into West Point at night is pretty freaky. There’s no electricity grid in
Monrovia, so it’s pitch black. SHANE SMITH: Hit
it on the wall. Hit it on the wall. So this is the craziest,
fucking scariest drive ever down here. We got a little bit lost in the
port, and you couldn’t see anything, there’s
no electricity. And then you just see people
wandering around, fucking shit, piss– fucking yelling at us, we want
money, we want money. Now there’s no lights in here. We’re gonna go in here,
this is the brothel. We’re gonna see what’s
going on. Hello. How are you? A lot of dudes are coming
in now, it’s crazy. I don’t know where
we’re going. MALE SPEAKER : Straight. SHANE SMITH: Straight. Wow. That room looks– MALE SPEAKER : Now we’re
in chalet number five. SHANE SMITH: I don’t know what
happens in here, but I don’t want to know. Wow. What the fuck goes
on in here, dude? Wow, wow, wow, wow, wow. Well, we were here a
little bit earlier. There was used condoms and
bloodstained sheets, and now they’ve sort of done it up. So we’re gonna interview some
of the girls, see what they have to say. We have a code for when
something’s freaky. We go, “It’s gnar gnar.”
Gnar gnar. SHANE SMITH : One of the things
we had heard since we arrived in Liberia was about the
alleged sexual misconduct by the UN staff, so we asked
the girls at the brothel about it. IMMANUEL NAGBE: OK, paradise. FEMALE SPEAKER: I wanted
to get me a job. IMMANUEL NAGBE: Yeah. FEMALE SPEAKER: For myself. IMMANUEL NAGBE: What sort
of work do you do in West Point now? IMMANUEL NAGBE: OK. IMMANUEL NAGBE: All right. IMMANUEL NAGBE: OK. IMMANUEL NAGBE: OK. FEMALE SPEAKER: Now. IMMANUEL NAGBE: All right. We were talking–
listen to me. IMMANUEL NAGBE: Listen
to me and sit down. Now listen. IMMANUEL NAGBE: Listen. SHANE SMITH : As soon as the
girl started screaming, a bunch of heads popped
into the room. And then when she started
screaming about money, everyone’s going, money, money, money, where’s the money? And at that point, Nagbe said
to us, you’d better get the hell out of here. So we sort of took off through
the tangled alleyways and just tried to get back to the car. SHANE SMITH: We’re getting the
fuck out here right now. And when we got to the car,
our driver– who was also supposed to be our security–
was so freaked out that he peeled out and nearly hit a
group of people that had surrounded the car. SHANE SMITH : And if you hit a
group of people down deep in West Point, that was it. It was a death sentence. They would have tore us apart. [CAR HONKING] SHANE SMITH : And to make things
even freakier, as we’re pulling out of West Point, Rambo
texts Myles and says, not only does Butt Naked want to
do the interview, but that he’s waiting at our
hotel for us. Yeah, now we’re going back to
sanity, to hang out with an ex-cannibal and multi-murderer,
who’s now staying at our hotel and
decided not to leave. Because they were there– they
want us to hang out. Meanwhile, he knows I have tons
of money, and he’s on the run because people
want to kill him. Should I just leave my
door open, General? Do you want to come in? SHANE SMITH : Now we are very
nervous to meet General Butt Naked, and he’s very nervous to
meet us, because he’s had several assassination attempts
against him. He wants to meet us and vet us
before he’ll OK an interview. When we told him about our
escape from West Point that night, he laughed, and
he seemed to ease up. After that, he asked for
a phone, he called Rambo, and it was on. JOSHUA BLAHYI:
[SPEAKING FOREIGN LANGUAGE] GENERAL RAMBO : Yeah? JOSHUA BLAHYI:
[SPEAKING FOREIGN LANGUAGE] JOSHUA BLAHYI: Yeah,
some white guys. They are good guys. The guy’s a good guy, man. Tell the boss lady hi, yeah? SHANE SMITH : We asked the
general, now known as Joshua Blahyi, why people were trying
to kill him, and he told us that it was because he had been
recently pardoned for his war crimes. And when we asked how he got
pardoned, he told us it was his conversion to Christ and
his becoming a man of God. SHANE SMITH : So we talked
with Joshua late into the night, until he told us to get
to bed because the next day he was going to show
us his Liberia. [SINGING IN FOREIGN LANGUAGE] SHANE SMITH: In the morning,
Joshua Blahyi took us out, and the first stop was the area
within Monrovia that he used to control during the war. SHANE SMITH : And who
would be attacking? SHANE SMITH: Alive? JOSHUA BLAHYI: Yes. SHANE SMITH: And what
does that do? SHANE SMITH : The next stop was
the place where there had been an assassination attempt
on Joshua’s life just the day before. SHANE SMITH : And he just–
he hit you and then ran? JOSHUA BLAHYI: Yeah. Yeah. SHANE SMITH : You jumped
over the car? JOSHUA BLAHYI: Yeah, jumped
over the car. SHANE SMITH : And who
do you think it was? SHANE SMITH : Hurt a lot
of people in the war? JOSHUA BLAHYI: In the war. SHANE SMITH : Next, Joshua
wanted to show us his mission in the country, where he was rehabilitating ex-child soldiers. SHANE SMITH : And are there are
a lot of people who fought during the war that can’t
get rid of the violence? JOSHUA BLAHYI: It’s very hard. SHANE SMITH: Very hard. JOSHUA BLAHYI: It takes time
to get rid of the violence. SHANE SMITH: Yeah. How did you get rid
of the violence? SHANE SMITH: Yeah. SHANE SMITH : OK. JOSHUA BLAHYI: Come,
you can look at– come, come and see. SHANE SMITH: Nobody
brought bug juice. [LAUGHING] SHANE SMITH: No, no, no, no. It’s OK. Well, I don’t mind
getting wet. SHANE SMITH : About a million
people in Africa die every year from malaria, and malaria
thrives in swamps exactly like this. SHANE SMITH: It’s very sploochly
on my moochly. Thanks. Good. Hello. MALE SPEAKER: Hello. SHANE SMITH: This is what
all fear stems from. Thank you. So these were some of the
boys that you fought with before, or no? SHANE SMITH: Yeah. So is that why your nickname
was General Butt Naked? SHANE SMITH: A lot of people
would drink or do drugs before fighting? SHANE SMITH: So you
killed the child– JOSHUA BLAHYI: Yes. SHANE SMITH: –and then
you drank the blood? JOSHUA BLAHYI: Yeah. SHANE SMITH : Now why would
you fight naked? [MEN SINGING] SHANE SMITH: This is his mission
that they’re building. They’re singing now. MALE SPEAKERS :
[SPEAKING FOREIGN LANGUAGE] JOSHUA BLAHYI : Welcome
to our home. SHANE SMITH : Thank you. SHANE SMITH: So you fought
for Charles Taylor and– SHANE SMITH: Johnson. So you were enemies before? JOSHUA BLAHYI : Yeah,
we’re enemies. SHANE SMITH : Yeah. SHANE SMITH : Where
are we right now? SHANE SMITH: Cemetery. SHANE SMITH: So this is the
cemetery where, after the war, there was nowhere to live, so
the people would come in, empty out the graves, and
live in the graves. Maybe up to about 4,000 people
lived in the graves. SHANE SMITH: It’s a
very heavy vibe. Empty graves everywhere. [MUSIC PLAYING] SHANE SMITH: We were just at
lunch, we were talking about– we ordered some ribs, and you
said, “No, I don’t like to eat–” JOSHUA BLAHYI: Flesh. SHANE SMITH: “–flesh.” And I
said, “Why don’t you like to eat flesh?” And you told me the
story about coming back from Nigeria. Could you tell us that story? SHANE SMITH: You were
eating human flesh? SHANE SMITH : What
would you eat? SHANE SMITH : Yeah. JOSHUA BLAHYI : Yeah. SHANE SMITH : Yeah. OK. JOSHUA BLAHYI: Yeah. SHANE SMITH: We’re talking
about eating human flesh in a graveyard. It’s a bit weird. JOSHUA BLAHYI: Yeah. SHANE SMITH: OK. So we can go. [JOSHUA BLAHYI SINGING] PREACHER : In Jesus’
father name! CONGREGATION : Amen! PREACHER : In Jesus’
father name! CONGREGATION : Amen! [MUSIC PLAYING] [APPLAUSE] PREACHER : Let it be done
in Jesus’ name. CONGREGATION : Amen. PREACHER : In Jesus’
mighty name. CONGREGATION : Amen. PREACHER: God bless you. Put your hands together
for Jesus. [APPLAUSE] PREACHER: Hallelujah. Hallelujah. OK. God bless you. Amen. [APPLAUSE] [MUSIC PLAYING, SINGING] SHANE SMITH : Liberia, on the
one hand, has more crime and poverty and rape
and cannibalism than you’ve ever seen. But on the other, it’s also got
a church on every street corner, every car has a
religious slogan, they have huge revivals with tens of
thousands of worshipers. It’s some sort of weird
heaven-and-hell scenario. [CHEERING] [CHEERING] FEMALE SPEAKER :
[SPEAKING FOREIGN LANGUAGE] [MUSIC PLAYING, SINGING] SHANE SMITH : While hanging out
with Joshua, I started to get a bit of Stockholm syndrome,
because he’s charming, the churches
are nice, there’s not as much danger. And I started to like him. [MUSIC PLAYING, SINGING] SHANE SMITH : But as he was
preaching, I thought to myself, this guy has killed tens
of thousands of people. In fact, he’s probably killed
the relatives of the people in the church worshipping
and adoring him now. And I’m thinking to myself,
what the fuck is going on? [MUSIC PLAYING, SINGING] FEMALE SPEAKER : Hallelujah! FEMALE SPEAKERS : Amen! [APPLAUSE] SHANE SMITH: I just want to say
thank you for having me in your church. Praise God. And I’d like to say thank you
to Joshua Blahyi for all the good work he’s doing. Hopefully, we can help, and
hopefully, we can show what we’re doing here in Liberia,
what you’re doing in Liberia, and we can help make it better
and bring more awareness to what’s happened here. JOSHUA BLAHYI: Amen. [APPLAUSE] SHANE SMITH : I have to admit
that when Joshua handed me the mic, I had no idea what
I was saying. At that point in the trip, I
felt like I was on acid. [APPLAUSE] [MUSIC PLAYING, SINGING] JOSHUA BLAHYI: [SINGING] I worship you because
of who you are. [MUSIC – THE ALMIGHTY DEFENDERS,
“ALL MY LOVING”] SHANE SMITH : And as I sat and
listened to Joshua preach, I thought about the fact that the
UN is leaving in less than a year, and Rambo had told
us that the generals are ready to fight. They have the soldiers, they
have the guns, and they’re living in abject poverty. And I wondered if that happened,
would Joshua stay with God, or would he return to
being General Butt Naked? JOSHUA BLAHYI: Somebody
shout “Glory!” CONGREGATION : Glory! JOSHUA BLAHYI: Let us pray. [MUSIC – THE ALMIGHTY DEFENDERS,
“ALL MY LOVING”]

The Cannibal Generals of Liberia


SHANE SMITH: In this episode, we
go to Liberia and hang out with cannibal warlords. MALE SPEAKER 1: I lift
it up on the temple. I’m gonna eat it. [GUNFIRE] MALE SPEAKER 1: It’s a Liberian
general’s heart. SHANE SMITH: I was afraid
probably the whole time I was in Liberia. There’s always this underlying
hum of violence. And the poverty there is so
crippling that you’re kind of like, why wouldn’t they
steal our camera? Why wouldn’t they steal
our clothes? I mean, people are starving. And all they know is war. So is that why your nickname
was General Butt Naked? SHANE SMITH: A lot of people
would drink or do drugs before fighting? SHANE SMITH: So you
killed a child? JOSHUA BLAHYI: Yes. SHANE SMITH: And then
drank the blood. JOSHUA BLAHYI: Yeah. [GUNFIRE] [GUNFIRE] MALE SPEAKER 2: So what
kind of war is this? Guerrilla? MALE SPEAKER 3: It’s
World War III. MALE SPEAKERS: It’s
World War III. [GUNFIRE] [HORN HONKING] SHANE SMITH: We here at Vice
have been fascinated by Liberia for a long time. It’s America’s first
and only foray into quasi-colonialism in Africa. It started as a back-to-Africa
movement for freed slaves, and in fact, the Constitution was
written in Washington, and Monrovia, the capital city of
Liberia, is actually named after President Monroe. And it became a state
in the 1840s. So the freed slaves go back to
Africa and promptly enslave the native Africans based on the
plantation method they had learned in the US, which lasts
for about 140 years, until Samuel K. Doe, the first native,
African-born Liberian, was elected. But this doesn’t
last very long. Why? Because an American-educated,
and some would say American-backed, rebel leader
named Charles Taylor and his buddy Prince Johnson came from
America and overthrew him. NEWS REPORTER: Despite reports
that the government wants talks with the rebels,
the violence goes on. [GUNFIRE] NEWS REPORTER: Rebel forces
stormed into the center of the capital today. They’re now less than a mile
from the executive mansion, where President Samuel Doe has
barricaded himself with about 500 soldiers. SHANE SMITH: In fact, Prince
Johnson, who got to Doe before his buddy Charles, ended up
torturing him, cutting him up, and is rumored to have
eaten him while filming the whole thing. SHANE SMITH: So Charles Taylor
finally gets elected with a campaign slogan that reads, He
killed my ma, he killed my pa, but I’ll still vote for him. And it works. He gets elected. But he’s so corrupt that soon
after, there’s a bunch of warlords fighting for control
over Liberia. The country falls into civil
war, and things go from bad to severely fucked up. [GUNFIRE] [GUNFIRE] SHANE SMITH: But this is like
a civil war on steroids. It’s a post-apocalyptic
Armageddon, with child soldiers smoking heroin,
cross-dressing cannibals, systematic rape– it’s total hell on Earth. [GUNFIRE] MALE SPEAKER 4: We
love the music. This is our music. NEWS REPORTER: They call
it the sound of death. MALE SPEAKER 4: Yeah, but it’s
the sound of music to us. SHANE SMITH: Liberia’s been in
the news a lot lately because Charles Taylor is on trial at
The Hague for war crimes. But we wanted to know
what happened to all the other warlords. So we contacted a Canadian
journalist who lives in Liberia named Myles Estey, who’s
kind of a Kurtz-like character– tall, skinny, skeleton guy who’s
had malaria more times than he’s had hot dinners– and he said he could get
us access to all these ex-warlords. So we said, great. We got on a plane and
we flew to Liberia. [MUSIC – THE ALMIGHTY DEFENDERS,
“ALL MY LOVING”] [HORN HONKS] [HORN HONKS] SHANE SMITH: When you first
get to Monrovia, the first thing you think is,
it’s really hot. It’s really hot. It’s really poor. And it’s totally chaotic. In fact, when we went to pick
up Myles, he had just gotten out of the hospital
with malaria. He gets in the car and he says,
are you ready to go? We’re going to Baboon Town in
the Red Light district to meet our first general, General
Bin Laden. So as we drove to Baboon Town,
we asked Myles, what’s up with the name General Bin Laden? And he said, well, a lot of the
generals took different names because they didn’t want
to be identified after the various wars. And these pseudonyms were meant
to strike terror into the hearts of their enemies. So there’s a General Rambo,
because he’s scary. There was a General Mosquito,
because mosquitoes are terrifying because they
bring malaria. The general that fought General
Mosquito was named General Mosquito Spray. [HORN HONKS] SHANE SMITH: And of course,
there’s General Bin Laden. In fact, there’s two
General Bin Ladens. Our General Bin Laden, we found
out en route, had just been put in jail. Now he didn’t know why, but
he suspected because the authorities found out that
we were coming with cameras to shoot him. MYLES ESTEY: And they say
they’re not going to let him out, but we can interview him
in the jail and we can interview the commanders. SHANE SMITH: Let’s do that. Let’s go there. MYLES ESTEY: Yeah. SHANE SMITH: So the minute we
arrive in Baboon Town, our car was surrounded by a bunch
of sketchy dudes. So when Myles came back and said
we could interview Bin Laden in the police station,
I was like, yeah. Let’s get out of here and get
in there really quick. [MONKEY SCREECHES] SHANE SMITH: So we get
into the police station, and it’s chaos. Some guards are saying,
you can go see him. Other guards are saying,
you can’t go see him. And we just have to sit
there and wait. I like being in the
police station. It’s nice. [MONKEY SCREECHES] SHANE SMITH: Monkey. Little monkey. He’s got herpes, I think,
or something. [MONKEY CHATTERING] SHANE SMITH: Hi. What’s wrong with the monkey? Why is the monkey here? SHANE SMITH: Why is
the monkey here? We’re in a police station in
the middle of the red light district to meet General Bin
Laden, and I’m wondering why the monkey’s here. [MONKEY CHATTERS] SHANE SMITH: And eventually
after sitting there for a while, we realized, oh, we’ve
got to grease some palms. So we gave them some
money, and bang. We were back into the jail and
we could talk to Bin Laden. Hey, Bin Laden. GENERAL BIN LADEN: Yeah. SHANE SMITH: How are you? MYLES ESTEY: This is
my friend Shane. SHANE SMITH: Shane. GENERAL BIN LADEN:
[INAUDIBLE]. SHANE SMITH: Nice to meet you. We’re going to try to get you
out of here now, and then we can go back. SHANE SMITH: All right. We’re going to do
it right now. MYLES ESTEY: Yeah. I know what he did. Just–we’re talking about
to get him out. What do we have to do? MYLES ESTEY: To who? SHANE SMITH: OK, we’ll stop. We’ll stop. It’s off. MYLES ESTEY: The video’s off. He’s carrying it, he’s just
holding it right now. SHANE SMITH: Look, we’re
good people. We’re good– nobody. Nobody’s recording. SHANE SMITH: Sure. I can give him cash. Can we– can we pay him
and pay you a fine and then take him? POLICEMAN: Fine. SHANE SMITH: OK, great. POLICEMAN: That’s good. SHANE SMITH: OK. OK, let’s go, let’s go, let’s
go, let’s go, let’s go. OK, let’s go, let’s go. MALE SPEAKER 5: Hey, hey, you. SHANE SMITH: We went in there. And we’re being followed by
the police right now. SHANE SMITH: Yeah, we might
have to change tapes or do something, because– what we do is we shoot cards,
and if they come, we can give them the tape. There’s nothing on the tape. SHANE SMITH: Yeah,
we do right now. SHANE SMITH: Our trip is getting
progressively heavier. SHANE SMITH: Yeah,
that’d be good. OK. I’m kind of a little bit worried
that the police are going to come get
us right now. I gave them a fake name
and fake number. SHANE SMITH: OK. Nice to meet you. SHANE SMITH: Nice to meet you. SHANE SMITH: Thank you. Thank you. SHANE SMITH: So after we got Bin
Laden out of jail, he was very excited to get us
up to his rooftop and tell us his story. And according to him, the
ex-generals, who are now the community leaders, are the only
ones doing anything to help the people. So maybe you could explain a
little bit about– so first of all, you became known as Bin
Laden during the war. GENERAL BIN LADEN:
During the war. SHANE SMITH: And then after the
war, now you’re sort of trying to help people by
carpentry and by karate. GENERAL BIN LADEN: And karate. SHANE SMITH: Do get
any money here? SHANE SMITH: Yeah, but the UN,
or the government doesn’t give you any money? SHANE SMITH: And is this–
is this area– this is Red Light, here? GENERAL BIN LADEN: It’s
Red Light [INAUDIBLE]. This is Red Light. SHANE SMITH: And is it– is there a lot of crime
in Red Light. GENERAL BIN LADEN: Yeah. It’s [INAUDIBLE]. This is Red Light. SHANE SMITH: Red Light. SHANE SMITH: So Myles comes
over, stops the interview, and says, we have to get the
fuck out of here now. And Bin Laden looks down,
and he goes, yeah, yeah. Those aren’t my guys. You guys should really go. So Bin Laden gave us an escort
and a couple of his guys got us through the crowd to the car,
and we got the fuck out. CAMERAMAN: Let’s go. Let’s go. Let’s go. Let’s go. Let’s go. Let’s go. Holy fucking shit. That was out of hand. We gotta get out of here. There was some heavy-duty
vibes there. SHANE SMITH: So after meeting
and being freaked out by General Bin Laden, we wanted
to see what the UN and government were doing
to rebuild Liberia. So we met a local journalist
named Nagbe and we asked him, and he said, you want
to see what the government and UN are doing? I’ll take you to West Point. So West Point is the worst slum
in Liberia, which makes it one of the worst slums in
West Africa, which makes it one of the worst slums
in the world. And when you first get there,
the first thing you want to do is get the hell out. It’s open sewers everywhere,
shit, piss, garbage, everything mixed in. And the stench is
overpowering. CAMERAMAN: Oh, dude. It really stinks here. SHANE SMITH: But I mean, one of
the first basic rules is, don’t shit where you eat. IMMANUEL NAGBE: That’s
it, but– SHANE SMITH: That’s the
number one rule. SHANE SMITH: But the government
has to do something about that– SHANE SMITH: So even in one of
the worst slums of Western Africa, you see the cultural
impact that America has there. All the kids are wearing Biggie
or Tupac t-shirts. And in fact, one kid
came up to us and said, hey, I’m a rapper. Can I rap for you? And we said yes. And it wasn’t about bling, and
it wasn’t about Cristal. [DOG BARKING] SHANE SMITH: And is there a
lot of malaria in here? SHANE SMITH: Needless to say,
in West Point, health conditions are foul. Diseases everywhere. Malaria, infections, and
AIDS are rampant. SHANE SMITH: Yeah? SHANE SMITH: Cover-up
for heroin. SHANE SMITH: Wow. IMMANUEL NAGBE: It’s
a big business. SHANE SMITH: We heard stories
that during the war, the rebels would go out in boats
with diamonds and trade the diamonds for weapons and
cocaine, and it was a lot of Colombians and Mexicans. SHANE SMITH: We find it
interesting, because cocaine and heroin are very
expensive drugs. So we were surprised to
find heroin here. Usually, in poorer countries,
there’s speed or meth or things you can make. SHANE SMITH: Why is that? [CHILD CRYING] SHANE SMITH: Liberian dollars? IMMANUEL NAGBE: Liberian
dollars. SHANE SMITH: So how
much is that? SHANE SMITH: So because of the
poverty, a lot of women have to become prostitutes. IMMANUEL NAGBE: Yes. SHANE SMITH: Sex worker. IMMANUEL NAGBE: We
can go this way. IMMANUEL NAGBE: Condoms, here. SHANE SMITH: So on our first day
in Liberia, we see child junkies, shit and piss
everywhere, malaria, AIDS, rape, and now we started hearing
about cannibalism. The scaredest I was, was we
actually shot in West Point, which is the worst slum
in West Africa. And it’s kind of these rabbit
warren streets. And we went to shoot in a
brothel with these junkies, and the junkies started
asking for money. Like, where’s my money? Where’s my money? And people started hearing
“money” and just flooded into the brothel. Like money, money, money. So we took off. The problem is, you take off,
you can’t go anywhere, because there’s these little streets
that, you know, there’s no rhyme or reason to them. So we’re all running
around in the dark. We finally get back to the
car, against all odds. We get in the car, and our
driver’s so freaked out about the mob following us that he
peels off and nearly kills some people. Which is terrifying, because
if you kill people down in West Point, they’ll just
take the car, rip you limb from limb. And so against all odds,
we get out of there. And I’m like shaking and
nervous, whatever. And as we go, we realize, oh,
now it’s time to meet General Butt Naked.

Identity Politics Are Alive And Well | Newsbroke (AJ+)


Identity Politics: What are they? Who
hates them? And why is the right the best at them? And why is that really scary? Hey Newsbroke, before we begin a minor tigger warning: We’re going to be
talking today about race, gender and (deep voice) Hillary Clinton. So why are we talking
about identity politics now? Well, it’s cuz they were everyone’s favorite
scapegoat after the 2016 election. It came from the right, obsessed with what
they see as an obsession. “Democrats’ obsession with identity
politics” “This obsession with identity politics” “I love stories so here’s one: it’s
about a candidate and a party who relied on identity politics so much it forgot
their own country. It’s about a candidate who got so obsessed over being a woman
she forgot she was human.” Cool story bro. Now tell the one about the president who
was so human he implied he wanted to bone his own daughter! But surprisingly
it also came from liberals: “We cannot be a caucus of identity politics.” “Ease up on the identity politics” “Senator Bernie Sanders, he thinks the Democratic
Party right now should move away from what he calls identity politics.” Et tu, Bernie? Wait wait wait, back up. What ARE identity politics anyway? and why is
every white guy on YouTube angry about them? To find out I’ll, now toss to T1J,
a black man on YouTube, to explain. Hello, Newsbroke. So what are identity politics?
well basically it’s any political belief that stems from your identity. For example your nationality or class or race or gender, your sexuality, your
geography, your language, basically anything you belong to other than like
Earth or the Internet. And we all have identities, so identity politics should
be a neutral term but these days it’s mostly used to refer to politics that
take on issues that affect people of color, women and the LGBTQ population . So
you know issues like police brutality, immigration reform and reproductive
rights. Because apparently only minorities care about those issues. So
basically that’s identity politics or at least that’s how people talk about it
these days. If you want to know more about how I feel about identity politics,
I actually did a whole video about it on my own channel. Thanks T1J. But like, you’re black. So you’re biased. Well you’re half
chinese and half italian yeah. Yeah, so half-white. Half as biased. anyway we’ll check
back with you later it’s true at times it did feel like Clinton over relied on
identity politics Secretary Clinton how would you not be a
third term at President Obama well I think that’s pretty obvious I think
being the first woman president would be quite a change from the presidents we’ve
had up until this point including President Obama is there a policy
difference Anderson let me just come off that amazing applause and tell you it’s
all on my website at WS n woman WS n woman WS n woman dot as in period as Ann
I used to get him dot Hillary rod woman Clinton dot yes we’ve all heard it
people on the right and the left saying that Clinton talked too much about
gender and not enough about jobs in the economy but according to a study of her
campaign speeches by a reporter at Vox Clinton spent very little time saying
words like Latino women’s rights and gay in fact more than anything else she
talked about jobs in the economy but I get it though she says jobs in
America here’s vagina vagina vagina Broyles might worry about the tactical
error with discussing identity politics the right gets defensive at the mere
mention of issues that affect minorities like the reaction to black lives matter
protests the reaction to the women’s March and Ann Coulter all of the time
people love to be self-righteous and that’s what a lot of this political
correctness of the identity politics is being used as and it gives you know sort
of boring people without any meaning in their lives and who aren’t particularly
bright it gives them a way to say no that’s a microaggression and then oh why
‘because i must be an important person you’ve just described your job if you
couldn’t rail against identity politics no one would know who you are and don’t
bite the hand that feeds you cuz it’s probably black well why worry about
issues that affect minorities when your party largely captures white voters
conservatives probably don’t have to worry about being stopped and frisked
questioned about their legal satis and don’t have to explain their
sexuality to aunt Jan on Thanksgiving getting the far-right to pay attention
to the issues of anyone from another perspective other than their own is like
trying to get President Trump to pay attention to a security briefing this
map of North Korea is boring okay it doesn’t even show all the states I won
but the right swears up and down that identity politics is just a liberal game
and I would argue that the left basically perfected identity politics
it’s very effective but it’s very divisive and we on the right should not
come anywhere close to it ah but you’re closer than you think right just listen
to how GI Jesus vice president Pence begins nearly every single speech I’m a
Christian a conservative and a Republican in that order I’m a Christian
a conservative and a Republican in that order I’m a Christian a conservative and
a Republican in that order in other words I’m white white and super white
can you imagine if a politician said I’m a woman a Muslim and a liberal in that
order Ann Coulter would immediately get a lifetime of book deals so it’s
ridiculous for the right or even the left for that matter to get so bent out
of shape about identity politics because while yes it can be a political tool to
rally certain bases of voters it’s not just a game played by women and
minorities Trump is a master of it do you think when he calls Mexicans rapists
and criminals that’s not identity politics do you
think when he goes after Muslims and says we’re going to put them in a
registry that’s not identity politics I don’t know what the hell you call it but
in my book that’s identity politics yes latina queen and yet we keep hearing
Hillary lost because she couldn’t connect to the white working-class while
Trump did but a study showed that where Clinton lost non-college educated voters
it wasn’t because of those voters class but rather their defensive perceptions
about race and gender perceptions that Trump exploited when Trump insults Carly
Fiorina megyn kelly and Hillary Clinton he’s laying his very mangled manhood on
the table when Trump says that the Mexican heritage of an Indiana judge
makes him untrustworthy he means that only white judges can be unbiased when
Trump says he fights for the working class and the silent majority he wants
you here I’m putting white people first the
left says black lives matter the right says blue lives matter the left says
undocumented immigrants the right says illegal alien the left says Happy
Holidays the right says why isn’t Jesus on my Starbucks cup Trump is alluding to
white identity but we never call it identity politics because whiteness is
seen as the norm and while white people are in the majority pandering to their
whiteness hasn’t just given us Trump it’s also given us Richard Spencer a guy
who very much believes in identity politics as a tool and Spencer’s
critique of Trump not overtly playing the white card is very telling if Donald
Trump would ultimately become about identity and he would ultimately
understand America as as a as historically as a white country he could
understand that I think he could dispense with all the talk of crime and
rape and murder and just say this is ours you’re not you are not us this
country is for us no it’s not okay fine take Florida
what Spencer’s arguing for is to drop code words and when you do that make
America great again isn’t a far cry from make America white again and white
identity politics aren’t new which is why they’re more dangerous they come on
top of legacies of white supremacy murdering natives enslaving Africans for
nearly 250 years creating a system of legalized oppression through Jim Crow
preventing a woman’s right to vote for 144 years after the country was founded
you know all the great stuff right t1j yeah I mean if you think about it not
using identity politics is a privilege in and of itself it’s kind of its own
identity really it’s just the status quo of whiteness straight white men have the
privilege of not having their opinions tinged by being brown or having a vagina
when I hear people say stuff like hey black people stop bringing up race all
the time stop making everything about race is just kind of proof that you’re
not listening because we are talking about race but we’re also talking about
class and gender it’s all intertwined hashtag intersectionality what we’re
saying is listen to us because historically as a society you haven’t
been doing that identity politics isn’t the problem the racist and sexist
society that causes people to use identity politics is
Thank You t1j so maybe we should call identity politics intersectionality and
while we’re at it let’s call the alright artisanal Nazis small-batch Nazis
hipster Nazis locally-sourced whoo it’s that time again everybody it’s time to
subscribe to news broke so get your little subscription fingers warm and
click your way could this be any corn here to say
subscribe subscribe to news broke and you know help us ninja chop all the
trolls who are definitely crawling all over this video like lice in a preschool
tell us what you think too about identity politics are they a problem are
they just a buzzword to trivialize important issues and would Richard
Spencer seem less like a Nazi if he had a bowl haircut let us know and as always
thank you for watching

Noam Chomsky – The 5 Filters of the Mass Media Machine


‘Propaganda’. Many use the word when talking about countries like North Korea, Kazakhstan, Iran. Countries viewed as authoritarian
through the lens of the western media. ‘Press freedom’. ‘Freedom of thought’. People use those terms when talking about countries like the United States, France, Australia. ‘Democracies’. In 1988, Noam Chomsky co-authored a book with Edward Herman called ‘Manufacturing Consent’. It blasted apart the notion that media acts
as a check on political power. That media inform the public,
serve the public so that we can better engage in the political process. In fact, media manufacture our consent. They tell us what those in power
need them to tell us … so we can fall in line. Democracy is staged with the help of media
that work as propaganda machines. Media operate through five filters. The first has to do with ownership. Mass media firms are big corporations. Often, they are part of even bigger conglomerates. Their end game? Profit. And so it’s in their interests to push for
whatever guarantees that profit. Critical journalism takes second place to
the needs and interests of the corporation. The second filter exposes
the real role of advertising. Media costs a lot more than consumers will ever pay. So who fills the gap? Advertisers. And what are the advertisers paying for? Audiences. And so it isn’t so much that the media are selling you a product – their output. They are also selling advertisers a product
– YOU. How does the establishment manage the media? That’s the third filter. Journalism cannot be a check on power because the very system encourages complicity. Governments, corporations, big institutions
know how to play the media game. They know how to influence the news narrative. They feed media scoops, official accounts,
interviews with the ‘experts’. They make themselves crucial to the process of journalism. So, those in power and those who report on them
are in bed with each other. If you want to challenge power, you’ll be
pushed to the margins. Your name won’t be down. You won’t be
getting in. You’ve lost your access. You’ve lost the story. When the media – journalists, whistleblowers,
sources – stray away from the consensus, they get ‘flak’. That’s the fourth filter.
When the story is inconvenient for the powers that be, you’ll see the flak machine in
action discrediting sources, trashing stories and diverting the conversation. To manufacture consent, you need an enemy
– a target. That common enemy is the fifth filter. Communism. Terrorists. Immigrants. A common enemy,
a bogeyman to fear, helps corral public opinion. Five filters. One big media theory. Consent is being manufactured all around you,
all the time.

5 Countries That Have Fallen into China’s Debt Trap


On this episode of China Uncensored, it’s a trap! HI, Welcome to China Uncensored. I’m your host, Chris Chappell. If you’ve noticed that China seems to be
coming up a lot more often in the news lately, well, you would be right. Chinese officials are eager to make China
a superpower. And they’re doing it with the help of an ancient Chinese Communist Party secret: Lots and lots of money. Yes, money. The key to a successful communist regime. The Party has over the last few years lent huge sums of money to cash-strapped countries, and then leveraged that debt to get what it
wants. A lot of this is tied to a trillion dollar
plan to build infrastructure around the world and then use it to create wealth, mostly for Chinese companies, move goods, mostly from China, and gain influence, mostly for the Chinese Communist Party. This project is the Belt and Road Initiative. Also known as One Belt, One Road. Let’s get together and feel alright. Now it’s nothing new for countries with
money to spare to help out their needy neighbors by offering them a loan. Plenty of countries do it, including the US. But the Chinese Communist Party does it, as they like to put it, “with Chinese characteristics” “This stands in stark contrast to China’s
approach, which encourages dependency using opaque contracts, predatory loan practices, and corrupt deals that mire nations in debt and undercut their
sovereignty, denying them their long-term, self-sustaining
growth.” As you might guess, some of the countries who have made these deals with China aren’t feeling so alright anymore. On today’s episode, we’ll look at five countries gripped by the Chinese regime’s debt trap. Number 5: Sri Lanka The first port of call is Sri Lanka. In 2010, Sri Lanka got a 1.5 billion dollar
Chinese loan to build a giant port in the town of Hambantota. Which would be great— except it has barely any shipping traffic. Without traffic through the port, Sri Lanka realized it couldn’t pay back
its debt to China. So instead, it signed away the entire port
with a 99-year lease. The China Merchants Port Holdings got a 70% controlling stake Hambantota port. “With this agreement, we have started to
pay back the loans,” the Prime Minister of Sri Lanka told Parliament, and talked about there being more money for
economic development. But critics say the cure might be worse than
the disease. Some see the deal as a precedent for countries
that owe money to China to accept deals that involve signing
over of territory. Territory that the Chinese regime might want
to eventually use for military purposes. “There is concern that the Chinese will
transform its 99-year lease of the Sri Lankan port of
Hambantota into another naval base, the exact ‘debt-trap’ method the Chinese
used in Djibouti.” And a Chinese naval base in Hambantota would be uncomfortably close to India. Which might be one reason India might be considering a deal with Sri Lanka to run what’s been
called the emptiest airport in the world. Sure, there may not be much air traffic, in fact, there is currently no air traffic
at all, but it is pretty close to the now-Chinese
port. That airport, by the way, was also built with the help of huge loans
from China. Speaking of uncomfortably close to India… Number 4: Pakistan With an overall lending pipeline of over 40
billion dollars for the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor,
or CPEC, which is a big part of the Belt and Road, Pakistan already owes China more than 6 billion
dollars. That kind of debt gives China some leverage. First, China took control of the strategic deep-sea port of Gwadar… …and will get to call the shots for 40 years
thanks to a lease. And now, the Chinese military is building
a joint naval and air force base for Chinese troops. And it’s just a short distance up the coast
from Gwadar. According to this report, Pakistan not only owes a ton of money to China, but it’s paying high interest rates on those
loans as well— with some loans as high as 5%. In other cases, Chinese investors were promised crazy high returns on these infrastructure
projects— like 34 percent each year, guaranteed by Pakistan’s government for
30 years. But there are signs that Pakistan isn’t
all that comfortable being so heavily indebted to China. Back in November, Pakistan announced it would not seek Chinese
funding for a new large-scale development. They said China’s conditions for financing
the long-delayed $14 billion Diamer-Basha dam on the Indus
River “were not doable and against our interest” Pakistan is also heading toward a debt crisis. That means they might have to get bailed out by the International Monetary Fund. Which would not only be embarrassing for Pakistan
and China, but also would probably limit future Chinese
investment. Plus, after a recent election, it’s not clear how the new prime minister is going to treat these ongoing deals with
China. Has Pakistan learned its lesson after being
forced to let China open a military base on its soil? Who knows? But certainly it’s not enough of a lesson
to stop… Number 3: Montenegro What’s Montenegro? It’s one of those Eastern European countries that’s approximately the size of Yankee
Stadium, and is located here. No wait, it’s here. It’s also the only country in Europe without
a highway. That’s not a joke. But then the Chinese Communist Party offered to help Montenegro build one. The Montenegro government calls “the construction
of the century and a pathway to the modern world.” It would be 100-mile highway with massive
bridges that cut through difficult mountains and valleys. But Montenegro only has 630,000 people. Which is fewer people than my small neighborhood
in Queens. So you might wonder why it has spent 950 million dollars on a highway. Especially since no one even knows where Montenegro
is, so are they really trying to get there on
a highway? There were two feasibility studies done in
2006 and 2012. Both of them suggested that their proposed
highway would not have enough traffic to justify the
cost. But fortunately, the Chinese Communist Party was there to help
with that. So construction has begun. And surprise! China got a pretty sweet deal. 70 percent of the workers building the highway
are from China, and in case of any legal dispute, an arbitration court in China has jurisdiction. And we all know the Chinese justice system is a model of fairness and rule of law, right? A European Union official, who asked to remain anonymous, is a little less enthusiastic, saying that Montenegro has run out of money. “They have strangled themselves. And for the time being this is a highway to
nowhere,” the official says. Hmmm. Highway to the Nowhere Zone doesn’t sound
as cool, does it? What’s worse, the road is only partly done. They need another 1.2 billion dollars to finish
it, which the International Monetary Fund says Montenegro can’t afford to borrow. With a debt to GDP ratio expected to hit 80%
soon, Montenegro’s government has already had
to raise taxes, freeze public sector wages and cut social
spending. But Montenegro’s Prime Minister has vowed to finish the highway “at any cost” and promises “to deepen cooperation with
China in other areas, including hydropower and tourism.” And that’s exactly the kind of commitment Chinese officials want. Number 2: The Maldives! Ah, the Maldives! A tropical paradise located in…ok, I had to look this one up, too. It’s here, in the Indian Ocean. Gorgeous weather, secluded beaches, and what’s this? The China Maldives Friendship Bridge?? It’s a 225 million dollar bridge that’s
funded mainly through a grant and a loan from, you guessed it, China. The loan is the tough part. With the funding of this bridge, it puts the Maldives’ debt to GDP ratio
at nearly 100%— meaning it owes as much in debt as its entire
economy generates in one year. Sounds kind of like my student loan debt. And take it from me, that’s not healthy. But the Maldives is already dealing with being swallowed up by rising sea levels, and could be underwater in 60 years. So really, does it matter if they’re also financially underwater from debt to China? They’re like, “Yeah, China, why don’t you try to collect your money
from the ocean.” Well, the problem of course, is that before the Maldives becomes the next
Atlantis, the Chinese Communist Party could still force
them to, say, give up land for a Chinese military base, which would just so happen to be in an excellent strategic location near India. But don’t worry, the Chinese Ambassador said in a recent speech that Chinese investments in the Maldives are
totally normal, and that “The allegations of ‘land grabbing’ and ‘debt trap’ are totally groundless.” Not that anyone asked, but… it’s better to get out ahead of these things. Sometimes. And that brings us to… Number 1: Djibouti. If you don’t know where Djibouti is, you’ve got a problem. Because I’ve talked about it so many times
on China Uncensored. The African country of Djibouti is home to
China’s first, but definitely not last, overseas military
base. Also, it’s just a few miles down the road from an American military base. Giving rise to a shocking incident where Chinese
personnel allegedly pointed lasers at US pilots. Well the joke’s on them, because the US military had already stopped
using cats as pilots. But childish laser games are the least of
America’s worries. The Washington Post recently asked, “Can the Trump administration stop China from taking over a key African port?” Why would it want to? Well, ever since the government of Djibouti seized control of the Doraleh Container Terminal from a Dubai-based company in February, there have been reports that it plans to strike
a deal with a Chinese-state-controlled firm to run
the facility. And it just so happens that the port is the
main access point for American, French, Italian and Japanese
bases in Djibouti, and is critical to launching anti-terrorism
missions in parts of Africa and the Middle East. The U.S. military is now warning that if a Chinese-state-run company gains
control of the port, “U.S. national security interests will be
put at risk.” Meanwhile, officials warn that Djibouti has
been growing closer to, and is increasingly indebted to, the Chinese government. If only someone could shine a light on this
problem. Some kind of bright, single-color beam of
light. So what do you think of the debt traps some countries have fallen into with China? Leave your comments below. And before we go, it’s time to answer a
question from a fan who supports China Uncensored on the crowd funding website Patreon. David Michael White Chris, which flavor of tea would you highly recommend for others to taste? This is probably the most important question I’ve ever answered on the show. I take tea very seriously. Years before I started China Uncensored, I worked at a Chinese tea house. So I know a thing or two. First of all, if you ever see some kind of
blended tea, like strawberry samurai green tea matcha latte, run the other way. Get some high quality, loose leaf tea, and learn how to brew it. Boiling water and green tea do not mix. Start with some cheaper teas to develop your
palate and gradually work your way up to more expensive
tea. My favorite type is Phoenix Oolong teas. And my personal favorite Phoenix Oolong tea is one called Ya Shi Xiang. Which means the fragrance of duck…poop. To use the more–polite–translation. The story goes the tea got that name because
it was so good, locals didn’t want to share it with outsiders
so they gave it a less than appealing name. And that’s the lesson. Jealously hoard your tea. Tea’s no joke. Thanks for the question! And remember, China Uncensored is supported by viewers like
you. So I’d like to ask you if you can, please support the show on the crowdfunding
website Patreon with a dollar or more per episode. Link is below. As a way of saying thanks, you can submit questions you have for me and I’ll answer them at the end of each
episode. Thanks for watching this episode of China Uncensored. Once again, I’m your host, Chris Chappell. See you next time. Have you been watching China Uncensored religiously for years because it’s the best and greatest
source for China-related infotainment? Of course you have! So support us where it counts. Contribute a dollar or more per episode by clicking this orange button. We have a crowdfunding website called Patreon, where you can get cool rewards. Click now.

OBASANJO BLASTS YOUNG LEADERS



you and by an American Idol we have oppressive now I you take these what you would you see we have each August to your best man as Speaker I'm the sower do expect you say it but laughter he believes you all okay what valid it is not and the words on what a Latino who did what did we do at the federal level the got rid of one we go to the beach so do respect the people in this government and yet we will be defect without that you talk stand it yes the martini went to college because I had no I did not and get to go out on more relaxed I decided look I want somebody who will succeed me happy within the facility type of magnet that's the future I want me to leave India I was living public office in 1979 with all that specially built for Nigeria specially useful material 20 brand new machines 20 some of them were hot delivered unto that speech when I give up 20 years better much much will I have liquidated you listen and most of the magnitude of it listen to the story of one of the ships it was scrapped I'm so happy we have my son's marine School in Rome or on the first two needles a sheet tray done without anything added to that ship that was soon for happy we know the potential to the new the spent a billion and have defeated and where we came that ship was going on it says for each what for – Liam spent when I have to defeat it and it went on his first voyage a very weak at work they ran to me and sent me cheaper than an estate those who are expected want million dollar fine they told a story I said cool examples were thirty I give you today and well I think what tell them not given to them before we did

West Africa economy: Leaders push for single currency ECO



there are topics that can both divide and bring West Africans together football with the Africa Cup of Nations how to properly grill a chicken and money that's because 15 West African countries have agreed to create and share a single currency called echo by next year it's a great idea if we have the same currency we could be one big country like America big and strong and then we will all be treated as equal already eight of the 15 countries used the same currency the African Francoeur CFA a legacy of French colonialism france's central bank acts like a manager holding part of their treasury to guarantee financial stability the seven other nations often deal with inflation and currency volatility with each of them directing their own monetary policy Omar I once see a graduate student in trade says he has watched leaders say a common currency is the solution since 1983 playing defensively others are being too aggressive and not thinking of the collective we need to play as a team for this to work but for everybody to win from it including Senegal while Nigeria is the continents biggest economy Senegal and Ivory Coast are some of the fastest growing in the world and yet the UN says less than 20% of trade here is happening among African countries the challenge is to get the big players in the region like Ivory Coast and Nigeria to stop competing against each other but to work as a team together for the benefit of the people of West Africa we're senegalese chicken stock maker Betty Sun a common currency is good for business allowing easier access to Nigeria's 420 billion dollar economy we need to move beyond the African franc to boost trade Nigeria is the driving force of West Africa's economy a single currency would allow us to overcome all of our challenges today it's a sizzling debate with each its own opinion while there may be uncertainty over the single currency regional leaders believe that in the end Africans will come out as winners Nikolas honk al Jazeera Dakar