Don Lemon, sheriff spar over police shootings


>>>OUR BREAKING NEWS TONIGHT. THREE OFFICERS DEAD, THREE WOUNDED IN BATON ROUGE. A TOUGH DAY FOR BATON ROUGE AND FOR THE COUNTRY. HERE TO TALK ABOUT HOW TO KEEP OUR POLICE SAFE IS SHERIFF DAVID CLARK OF MILWAUKEE COUNTY, WISCONSIN. HE’S GOING TO BE SPEAKING AT THE REPUBLICAN CONVENTION TOMORROW NIGHT. SHERIFF, THANK YOU VERY MUCH FOR THAT. HORRIFIC DAY. SPOKE TO THE HEADS OF THE SHERIFF DEPARTMENT AND POLICE DEPARTMENT AND THE STATE POLICE DOWN THERE. THEY TOLD US HOW THEIR HEARTS WERE REELING. THEIR MESSAGE IS PEACE AND COMING TOGETHER IN THE COUNTRY. WHAT’S YOUR MESSAGE?>>YOU DON’T BELIEVE THAT FOR ONE MINUTE, DO YOU?>>THAT THEIR MESSAGE IS?>>THAT’S WHAT THEY SAID TO ME.>>OKAY. YEAH, I BELIEVE THEM.>>PROTESTS OVER THE DEATHS OF THE COPS IN BATON ROUGE?>>I DON’T KNOW THAT.>>ANY RIOTS OR PROTESTS OVER THE POLICE OFFICERS IN DALLAS, TEXAS?>>WHAT ARE YOU ASKING?>>IT’S A PRETTY SIMPLE QUESTION.>>I ASKED YOU WHAT YOUR MESSAGE TO THE PEOPLE, THEIR MESSAGE IS ONE OF PEACE. WHAT IS YOUR MESSAGE?>>MY MESSAGE HAS BEEN CLEAR FROM DAY ONE TWO YEARS AGO. THIS ANTI-COP SENTIMENT FROM THIS HATEFUL IDEOLOGY CALLED BLACK LIVES MATTER HAS FUELED THIS RAGE AGAINST THE AMERICAN POLICE OFFICER. I PREDICTED THIS TWO YEARS AGO.>>DO YOU KNOW THAT THIS WAS BECAUSE OF THAT?>>YES, I DO.>>AS A LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICER — >>I’VE BEEN WATCHING THIS FOR TWO YEARS. I’VE PREDICTED THIS. THIS ANTI-POLICE RHETORIC SWEEPING THE COUNTRY HAS TURNED OUT SOME HATEFUL THINGS INSIDE OF PEOPLE THAT ARE NOW PLAYING THEMSELVES OUT ON THE AMERICAN POLICE OFFICER. I WANT TO KNOW WITH ALL OF THE BLACK ON BLACK VIOLENCE IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, BY THE WAY, WHEN THE TRAGEDIES HAPPENED IN LOUISIANA AND MINNESOTA, YOU KNOW THAT 21 BLACK PEOPLE WERE MURDERED ACROSS THE UNITED STATES? WAS THERE ANY REPORTING ON THAT?>>BLACK OFFICER WHO WAS KILLED TODAY.>>WAS THERE ANY REPORTING ON THAT?>>SHERIFF, PLEASE. LET’S JUST KEEP THE VIBE DOWN HERE. SO I UNDERSTAND, AND, LISTEN — >>I’M LOOKING AT THREE DEAD COPS THIS WEEK AND I AM LOOKING AT FIVE LAST WEEK. YOU’RE TRYING TO TELL ME TO KEEP IT DOWN?>>CAN WE JUST PLEASE? WE CAN KEEP IT CIVIL. THE MESSAGE TO PEOPLE AT HOME, I’M SURE YOU WANT IS ONE OF CIVILITY.>>DON, I WISH YOU HAD THAT MESSAGE OF CIVILITY — >>I’M TRYING TO HAVE A CONVERSATION WITH YOU — >>FOR THIS HATEFUL IDEOLOGY. THESE PURVEYORS OF HATE.>>WHAT I WANT TO SAY TO YOU IS THESE PEOPLE — ARE WISCONSIN, HERE LIVE IN CLEVELAND, YOU’RE SET TO SPEAK TOMORROW. AND ALL I WANT TO DO IS HAVE A CONVERSATION WITH YOU, I CAN’T HAVE A CONVERSATION WITH YOU IF WE’RE BOTH TALKING AT THE SAME TIME. WHAT IT SOUNDS LIKE TO ME IS THAT YOU’RE ACCUSING ME OF VIOLENCE, BY SUPPORTING A NARRATIVE THAT I’M NOT NECESSARILY IN SUPPORT OF. I DON’T SUPPORT VIOLENCE AGAINST POLICE OFFICERS OR ANYONE. IF YOU WANT TO HAVE A CONVERSATION, I AM MORE THAN WILLING TO WELCOME A CONVERSATION WITH YOU, I DON’T DISAGREE WITH YOU THAT THERE’S A NARRATIVE ACROSS THE COUNTRY THAT COULD BE HARMING POLICE OFFICERS, BUT WE DON’T KNOW RIGHT NOW, AS SOMEONE WHO WAS IN LAW ENFORCEMENT, IF THAT WAS THE ACTUAL CAUSE OF IT.>>LET ME ASK YOU THIS, DO WE KNOW THAT GENERALLY THE AMERICAN LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS ARE RACIST? DO WE KNOW THIS?>>GO ON.>>I ASKED A QUESTION.>>DO I KNOW THAT IN GENERAL AMERICAN LAW ENFORCEMENT IS RA RACIST? IF YOU’RE ACCUSING THAT LAW ENFORCEMENT ACROSS THIS COUNTRY AS A WHOLE IS RACIST, THEN YOUR ASSUMPTION IS WRONG.>>THIS WHOLE ANTI-POLICE RHETORIC IS BASED ON A LIE. THERE IS NO DATA, AND YOU KNOW THIS, THERE IS NO DATA, THERE IS NO RESEARCH THAT PROVES ANY OF THAT NONSENSE. NONE.>>YOU HAVE TO BE MORE SPECIFIC ABOUT WHAT DATA AND WHAT NONSENSE YOU’RE TALKING ABOUT.>>THAT LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS TREAT BLACK MALES DIFFERENT THAN WHITE MALES IN POLICING IN THESE URBAN CENTERS.>>THERE IS DATA THAT SUPPORTS THAT.>>THERE IS NOT DATA.>>THE PRESIDENT SPOKE ABOUT IT. CEDRIC ALEXANDER, WHO’S A LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICER.>>THE PRESIDENT IS LYING ABOUT IT. HE SAID IT THE OTHER DAY WHEN HE SAID THAT BLACK MALES ARE TWO TIMES MORE LIKELY TO BE SHOT BY A WHITE POLICE OFFICER AN A BLACK POLICE OFFICER. THAT IS A LIE.>>THAT IS NOT A LIE. THE RESEARCH THAT WE HAVE FROM “THE WASHINGTON POST” — >>”THE WASHINGTON POST” DEBUNKED THAT NONSENSE.>>SHERIFF, THERE’S ALSO RESEARCH — >>HE CONTINUES.>>FROM A HARVARD PROFESSOR THAT ALSO SHOWED THAT BLACK PEOPLE ARE TREATED MORE AGGRESSIVELY BY POLICE OFFICERS — >>NO, YOU WHERE WRONG AND YOUR INTERPRETATION OF THAT HARVARD STUDY, I READ THE STUDY. THAT’S NOT WHAT HE SAID. HE SAID HE WAS SURPRISED TO FIND — >>HE WAS SURPRISED TO FIND THAT IN SHOOTINGS, THE MOST SEVERE IN SHOOTINGS, HE FOUND NO EVIDENCE THAT THERE WAS A DIFFERENCE. ALSO IT SHOULD BE NOTED, THAT THERE’S A STUDY OF A VERY SMALL SAMPLING OF POLICE DEPARTMENTS ACROSS THE COUNTRY, MANY DID NOT FIND IT CREDIBLE. BUT IT’S ALSO INTERESTING THAT IN THAT RESEARCH HE FOUND THAT BLACK WERE TREATED DIFFERENTLY WHEN IT CAME TO AGGRESSIVE POLICING.>>ARE WE TALKING ABOUT GENERALLY? OR ARE WE TALKING ABOUT POLICE OFFICERS BEING UNDER ATTACK. LET’S GO BACK TO WHEN THIS WHOLE THING STARTED IN FERGUSON. >>YOU’RE LUMPING A WHOLE BUNCH OF THINGS INTO ONE. >>THAT’S WHERE THIS WHOLE PHONY MOVEMENT GOT STARTED. >>YOU’RE TALKING ABOUT BLACK LIVES MATTER?>>RIGHT.>>SO YOU WOULD NEED TO SPEAK TO SOMEONE WHO IS A MEMBER OF BLACK LIVES MATTER ABOUT WHETHER THEY ARE — HAVE PERPETRATED A FRAUD ON THE AMERICAN PEOPLE, THAT’S UP TO BLACK LIVES MATTER, I’M NEITHER A MEMBER OF BLACK LIVES MATTER, I’M NEITHER A SUPPORTER OR SOMEONE WHO DOESN’T SUPPORT THEM.>>CAN YOU SUPPORT THE ANTI-POLICE RHETORIC COMING FROM THIS HATEFUL IDEOLOGY.>>AS A JOURNALIST SILTING ON TELEVISION, I DON’T HAVE TO CONDEMN ANYTHING. IT’S OTH . >>IT’S LIKE GROUPS LIKE THE KKK, I CONDEMN IT. THERE IS NO PLACE IN AMERICAN DISCOURSE FOR THAT SORT OF VILE, VITRIOLIC HATE COMING OUT OF THAT IDEOLOGY. THIS HAS FUELED AND FANNED THE FLAMES OF THIS ANGER TOWARD THE AMERICAN POLICE OFFICER, THERE’S ONLY ONE GROUP IN AMERICA, ONE TIME, THAT TRULY CARES ABOUT THE LIVES OF BLACK PEOPLE IN THE YOU ARE BAN GHETTO, AND IT’S THE AMERICAN POLICE OFFICER, WHO GOES OUT THERE ON A DAILY BASIS, TO PUTA ATHEIR LIVES ON THE LIN TO PROTECT WHO? BLACK PEOPLE. LET’S HAVE A CONVERSATION ABOUT THE BLACK ON BLACK CRIME WHICH KILLS MORE BLACK MALES, WHICH IS MORE LIKELY IN THE UNITED STATES THAN A LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICER.>>THAT’S A DIFFERENT CONVERSATION. WE CAN WALK AND CHEW GUM AT THE SAME TIME. THERE’S AN ISSUE WHEN IT COMES TO VIOLENCE. IT’S CRIME, WHITE PEOPLE TEND TO KILL WHITE PEOPLE. BLACK PEOPLE TEND TO KILL WHITE PEOPLE. THERE IS A DIFFERENT CONVERSATION THAN POLICE BRUTALITY. AND WE’RE NOT HAVING THAT CONVERSATION RIGHT NOW. I WANT TO BE CLEAR WITH YOU, I CONDEMN ALL VIOLENCE OF ANY TYPE. JUST FOR THE RECORD.>>IT WAS A SITUATION BETWEEN MIKE BROWN AND DARREN WILSON, WAS THAT POLICE BRUTALITY?>>WE’RE NOT TALKING ABOUT MIKE BROWN AND DAREN WILSON. IF YOU’RE TALKING ABOUT WHAT THE JUSTICE DEPARTMENT SHOWED, IT EXONERATED OFFICER CARRRCARREN DA DACAR DAREN WILSON. >>YOU’RE GOING TO SEE THAT BLACK MALES ARE OVERREPRESENTED IN TERMS OF BEING INVOLVED IN VIOLENT CRIME, THAT’S GOING TO MEAN MORE ARRESTS, MORE PEOPLE GOING TO PRISON. THIS STUFF HAS ALREADY BEEN DEBUNKED.>>SHERIFF, THERE’S A DIFFERENT CONVERSATION.>>ANY TIME YOU DON’T HAVE A RESPONSE TO SOMETHING I SAY — >>THE REASON I DON’T HAVE A RESPONSE IS THAT WE’RE HAVING TWO DIFFERENT CONVERSATIONS. I’M ASKING THE QUESTIONS HERE, YOU’RE ANSWERING THE QUESTIONS BY ASKING QUESTIONS ABOUT SOME OTHER SUBJECT THAT WE’RE NOT DISCUSSING, THAT’S NOT A CONVERSATION. >>WE’RE TALKING ABOUT THE HATEFUL IDEOLOGY OF BLACK LIVES MATTER, YOU CAN’T BE A MEMBER, IT’S AN IDEOLOGY, IT’S A HATEFUL IDEOLOGY.>>I UNDERSTAND THIS IS A VERY SENSITIVE TIME FOR YOU.>>THESE INDIVIDUALS — >>AND SHERIFF, WE APPRECIATE

Stamped from the Beginning: Ibram X. Kendi on the History of Racist Ideas in U.S.


AMY GOODMAN: This is Democracy Now!, democracynow.org,
The War and Peace Report. I’m Amy Goodman. We’re joined today by historian Ibram X.
Kendi, professor of history and international relations, founding director of the Anti-Racist
Research and Policy Center at American University. He just left the University of Florida at
Gainesville. He is the author of the National Book Award-winning
Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America. If you could take us through your thesis,
Professor Kendi, as you raise the profile of five figures through history, right through
today, Angela Davis, and talk about their role in our history? IBRAM X. KENDI: Sure. And so, the thesis for the book actually came
about through researching for the book, which I think is a good thing. And that was, I ended up entering into this
history of racist ideas believing this common idea that, really, the sort of origins, the
cradle, of racist ideas is ignorance—are ignorance and hate, and that ignorance and
hate leads to racist ideas, and it’s these people who have these racist ideas who are
the people who institute racist policies, like slavery, segregation and even massive
incarceration. And so, the more I sort of studied this history,
the more I contextualized the development of these ideas in their historical moment,
and, more importantly, the more I distinguished between the producers of racist ideas and
the consumers, and decided to study the producers, the more I found that people were producing
racist ideas to justify existing racist policies. In other words, racist policies were becoming
before racist ideas. And those racist policies were emerging out
of self-interest. And so, you had economic, political and even
cultural self-interest driving the creation of racially discriminatory policies, and then
the need to justify those policies led to the development of racist ideas, and then
those racist ideas and their circulation—or, more so, consumption—led to our ignorance
and hate. And so I chronicle this history through five
major characters. And the first character is Cotton Mather,
who was a Boston theologian, who, at the time—he lived from the 1660s to the 1720s—race or
racial ideas were largely theological ideas, because theological ideas were largely scientific
ideas. And so, he was involved in popularizing many
of the early theological ideas justifying or making the case for black inferiority. By the emergence of the United States, the
racial discourse became more secular, and particularly through the role of Thomas Jefferson. And Thomas Jefferson died on the eve of the
abolitionist movement—Thomas Jefferson being the second major character in the text—and
that abolitionist movement was largely spearheaded by William Lloyd Garrison, who of course was
the third major character. And W.E.B. Du Bois was the fourth major character. He, of course, was one of the sort of fathers
of civil rights and black power. And the last major character, that covers
the last 50 years, where mass incarceration, in particular, became front and center, was
Angela Davis. AMY GOODMAN: And so, talk about, from Cotton
Mather to Angela Davis, how they embodied your idea of how racist policies and ideas
develop. IBRAM X. KENDI: So, in the case of Cotton
Mather, Cotton Mather was involved in probably the first great American debate over race,
which was whether black people could become Christians. And slaveholders who were also Christian made
the case that black people were too barbaric. Cotton Mather, being a major Boston theologian,
being a major minister wanting to have a new group of people to proselytize to, made the
case that they can be Christianized, because their souls have the capacity to be white,
even though their bodies are black and inferior and worthy of enslavement. And so, this debate, he made this case for
this debate because he wanted to open up the sort of reins on the church to be able—particularly
the Puritan church, to be able to proselytize to black people. So he had this sort of hidden self-interest,
this hidden cultural self-interest, that led to his idea. And, you know, Thomas Jefferson, as many of
you would understand, I mean, he was a slaveholder who, of course, wanted to create ideas that
allowed him to continue slaveholding. And, you know, all the way up to sort of Angela
Davis. Angela Davis, I chronicle as, you know, this
major anti-racist theorist, because I really sort of show the debate, really, between racist
and anti-racist ideas. And I show, particularly within the realm
of criminal justice, that, you know, all of these ideas justifying law and order, justifying
the war on drugs, justifying tough on crime, and now justifying police being exonerated
for killing black lives, that Angela Davis was long at the forefront of challenging those
ideas by challenging the racist ideas that were underlying them. AMY GOODMAN: You write very poignantly in
the prologue to Stamped from the Beginning, “I somehow managed to write this book between
the heartbreaks of Trayvon Martin and Rekia Boyd and Michael Brown and Freddie Gray and
the Charleston 9 and Sandra Bland, heartbreaks that are a product of America’s history
of racist ideas as much as this history book of racist ideas is a product of these heartbreaks. Young Black males were twenty-one times more
likely to be killed by police than their white counterparts between 2010 and 2012, according
to federal statistics.” And you go on to say, “The under-recorded,
under-analyzed racial disparities between female victims of lethal police force may
be even greater. Federal data show [that] the median wealth
of White households is a staggering thirteen times the median wealth of Black households—and
Black people are five times more likely to be incarcerated than Whites.” Talk more about this. IBRAM X. KENDI: Sure. Well, Amy, this is—I mean, since the beginning
of the United States, since the beginning of colonial America, there has been what’s
called racial disparities, as you just outlined, racial disparities where black people were
more likely to be poor, black people were more likely to be killed by the police, black
people were more likely to be imprisoned. And so the question becomes: Why? Why is it that black people are on the lower
end of these racial disparities? Why does racial inequality exist in this country? And really, the racial debate has largely
been trying to answer that question. And really, Stamped from the Beginning chronicles
that long racial debate trying to answer that question. And really, there’s been three positions,
and those positions still persist to this day. The first position states that it’s because
black people are inferior. The reason why so many more black people are
being killed by the police is because black people keep acting recklessly before the police. If black people would act better, then this
would not be a problem. So they principally state that there’s something
wrong and inferior about black people. This is what I call the segregationist position. On the other side of the debate has been the
anti-racist position. The anti-racist position states that the racial
groups are equal. There’s nothing wrong or right about black
people or any other racial group of people. So, because the racial groups are equal, it
must—these disparities, these inequities must be the result of racial discrimination. So they spend their time challenging racial
discrimination. And then the third position, which is called
the assimilationist position, actually argues both. Typically and historically, they’ve stated
that, yes, there is racial discrimination, but there’s also something wrong and inferior
about black people. And so, they’ve sought to civilize and develop
black people at the same time they were challenging racial discrimination. AMY GOODMAN: So talk about where Black Lives
Matter fits into this picture, the organizing from the grassroots up, and where you see
it going. IBRAM X. KENDI: Yeah, I think it fits precisely
into this picture, because I think Black Lives Matter activists have made the case that the
problem is the criminal justice system, that the problem is racist policing, that the problem
is the laws that are being created that make the case that there’s something wrong with
the people as opposed to the environment that these people—the lack of jobs and resources
these people are being faced with. And so, I’m hoping, and I’m sure many
people are hoping, that Black Lives Matter and many other activists, anti-racist activists,
who have been inspired by Black Lives Matter, and other types of activists will recognize
the anti-racist position, which is that either the racial groups are equal or they’re not. And if you believe that the racial groups
are not equal, that there’s something wrong or inferior about black people, that that’s
a racist idea. And so you cannot continue to imagine that
this nation is post-racial at the same time that you don’t believe that the racial groups
are equal, that you’re championing policies that actually discriminate against black people. AMY GOODMAN: Talking to historian Ibram X.
Kendi. His book won the National Book Award, Stamped
from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America. And you talk about overall racial inequities,
from everything from wealth to health. Certainly, when we look at what’s happening
right now in the Senate, though the healthcare bill has been put off for the moment, now
opposed by nine Republicans, who run the political spectrum, feeling that regulations—like,
what, Senator Paul of Kentucky—have to be stricter, that Medicaid and other healthcare
policies and safety nets have to be dismantled, to those who feel that this is way too stringent. But always at the bottom of this you have
the most vulnerable in society. So talk about from wealth to health, Professor
Kendi. IBRAM X. KENDI: So, I mean, from wealth, I
mean, the Great Recession, some have made the case, was one of the largest losses of
black wealth in American history, one of the largest losses of Latino wealth in American
history, that when we have these major economic catastrophes, you know, those people who are
the most sort of underprivileged are most likely to lose out. But I think the healthcare debate and, really,
argument, I think, is even more indicative, you know, of what we’re talking about. I mean, the Affordable Care Act led to 11
percent more black and Latino people becoming insured, which is a dramatic sort of development
within black America, within Latino America. And so, more—it eliminated these massive
disparities—or, I mean, eliminated—reduced these disparities between racial groups that
are uninsured. And so, you know, to think about a new healthcare
bill that’s going to reduce the number of people who—I’m sorry, increase the number
of people who are uninsured, I mean, many of those people are probably going to be black
or Latino, and then, therefore, we’re going to have an increase in these disparities. And then what racist ideas will say is, “Well,
it’s those black people’s fault. It’s those Latinos’ fault. You know, they should be working harder. There’s something wrong with them.” And so, they’ll create racist ideas to justify
those disparities. And I should also say that, you know, I think
one of the most consequential manifestations in this country that black life does not matter
is the disparity between how long black people live. I mean, white people are more like three-and-a-half—have
a lifespan of three-and-a-half years in this country. And I think, you know, many of these things
sort of result in that, including people having access to healthcare. AMY GOODMAN: You’re writing a new book on
how to be an anti-racist, which will be released next year. Can you give us a little preview? IBRAM X. KENDI: So, you asked about the—Amy,
ask the question again? I’m sorry. AMY GOODMAN: I was just saying, you’re writing
a new book, How to Be an Anti-Racist. IBRAM X. KENDI: Oh, yes. AMY GOODMAN: Give us a preview. IBRAM X. KENDI: Sure. So, I mention in the prologue of Stamped from
the Beginning that, you know, before I could chronicle anyone else’s racist ideas, I
first had to come to grips with my own. And so, really, in How to Be an Anti-Racist,
I want to sort of chronicle my journey, my personal journey, of really, you know, being
raised and consuming many racist ideas to seeking to become somebody who is an anti-racist. And so I begin the book with a speech that
I gave in high school, in which I uttered all of these racist ideas, all of these things
stating that there’s something wrong with black people. And I take readers through my own personal
journey, while simultaneously revealing many of the concepts of what it means to be an
anti-racist. AMY GOODMAN: Finally, Ibram X. Kendi, can
you tell us the origins of your name? IBRAM X. KENDI: Sure. So, Ibram is—was given to me by my parents. It means “exalted father.” It’s a derivative of Abraham. Came up in a Christian church—I mean, a
Christian family. My parents were part of the black theology
movement in the early ’70s. And my last name, Kendi, my wife and I, when
we wed in 2003, we decided to choose a name together. And so, Kendi is a Meru, in Kenya, name that
means “loved one.” AMY GOODMAN: And you unveiled this at your
wedding to your family and friends? IBRAM X. KENDI: Yes. Yes. AMY GOODMAN: Well, Ibram X. Kendi, I want
to thank for you being with us, professor of history and international relations and
founding director of the Anti-Racist Research and Policy Center at American University. He’s just leaving the University of Florida
at [Gainesville]. He’s the author of Stamped from the Beginning:
The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America, which is winner of the 2016 National
Book Award. This is Democracy Now! When we come back, we look at a lawsuit in
Washington against the Washington, D.C., police for their treatment of protesters at the inauguration
of President Trump. Stay with us.

Ukraine’s “warzone” around Independence Square – Truthloader


These of the streets of Kiev, looking more
like a warzone than a mass protest. Molotov cocktails and fireworks were being
thrown as the police and protesters clashed through the night. It’s the fifth consecutive day of violence
in and around Independence Square as the battle against President Viktor Yanukovich continues. The first fatalities in the protest movement,
which began last November, were reported yesterday with three people killed, at least two from
gun shots. This video emerged of bodies being carried
from a makeshift Red Cross medical centre near the square. Another later showed the same centre completely
smashed up and vandalised. It’s reported the damage was inflicted as
these riot police stormed the building. There’s been constant to-ing and fro-ing as
the riot police try to destroy the barricades put up by the demonstrators, who fight back
and erect new ones in response. The violence has continued despite calls to
remain peaceful from opposition leaders like Vitali Klitschko. And more action has been promised unless a
snap election is called within 24-hours. It all stems from disagreements over whether
to sign a trade agreement with Russia or the European Union, with the President preferring
the Russian option and the Kiev movement demanding closer ties with Europe. If you want more information on that there’s
a video annotated on screen now as well as in the video description. But this was the aftermath of last night’s
violence filmed this morning, with tyres still burning away and black smoke bellowing out
into the skies of Kiev.

Bobi Wine’s Transition from Musician to Politician (Episode11 Season 5 – English)



greetings ladies and gentlemen boys and girls this the news feed presented to you by very sly congested Dino follow follow the beat follow the beat from the studio to the streets in front with the flow gets you chef and in the no sleep relax enjoy the new follow what's the difference between a politician and a mobster the simpler come a bit closer this year first let's wait and see what's changed suffer super drug because ultimately see some exercising police brutality professor J I can Joseph Hamlet hit the chaps with a single D on the fake well can you have a hidden key go go they check the game with every step they took then they drop their dreadlocks for a different week they throw when their sins were three pcs now he's got a spotty wine and Kenya Jaguar have joints to hide professor Jeff from Tanzania to make history as the first four in East Africa to move from music to become legislate are true but they are not alone on this continent today special is about conscious artists what music may have meant a permanent but their police to be political and social activity how was Bobby wine a popular musician transitioned into such a popular politician it's not just by updating his look opposite politics on Facebook he then he has two days to his constituency split second music what can family he has concerts in every corner of the country at the end he speaks as Emperor but Chaplin II received by his fans as our president 2021 a reception that raises the first disco video release a Hizb it's like the sky's the limit voicing his views on the proposed amendment to let the president contest and swept the age limit some ask why he's so focused on presidency and what has it done for his he hasn't hit not his area in the list he built seven seven bottles in chat on the east he is equipping youth develop our skills but his not exercise he lets his focus SPO not that food wine is left around the nation no doubt he appeals to the youngest population but he already felt the threat of being the opposition or is arrested for its proper demonstration what do you think is funny when making the right move there's this position as an MP really has a lot to prove do you know that elections in Kenya yes results protested by rhino Ginga well since the happen in Shapira in an attempt to avoid election violence there's any twist police interference has people protested fully shut them down as the dropouts appease so Lisa with cotija optimism grew up in Kibera slums imagine that's happening in your hometown you suck on it shoot down innocent bystanders yeah but hold it right there finger on the trigger but did they have to pull it why would it take this rubber bullet couldn't keep quiet not have just seen something so violent you have a responsibility to hold a witness knowing nothing changes has produced many of these leaders singing for justice and peace one of them was the greatest man in Lagos the alphabet box Fela Kuti from Nigeria and political artists activists of Africa now hasn't let you in Legos Heath Ledger and it's under budget so he is for sure and pan-african dreams but he used to be a wanted man in the seventies and eighties by the corrupt regimes in the 50s fell our sins and went to study medicine but shifted to music works in London and came back besides the Roman government on the rhythm of alpha beta these music genre infused with the high life doesn't political he became famous to disband the Afrika 70 in Ghana his songs were pieces on the target e which prevented him from entering the country like the mesmerizing swampy and international deep deep in the face of all politicians falafel that his own Institute the Republic versus independent state and the hopefulness missions the fact of many waves movement on the paper was this political party even went for presidency but the donors protected is transiency for decades the masses went crazy and Tama became an international celebrity touring Europe and the US water machines in Nigeria remained the main things for quite the 90s as he was fighting HIV his journey ended in 1997 after a life of beat and imprisonment he left an impressive legacy he sank at the African shrine opened where was at that place daily and finally this statue a headless called an ECG is the land official recognition of this artist activist prodigy I'm ready reporting for news beats today we salute our fellow rappers in Gabon they are conscious messages for support phone they've been through quite a lot she's very 90s we develop it in the 90s people had enough of the old dictator Omar Bongo in power since the 60s and many artists and demonstrators they had opinions Roy's press and with some success corporate reinstall a multi-party system too freedom of expression if I must win green like a square big many Rockets lift off the system and Twitter's rough cool down until my bumper tight as ever since early 2009 elected he would have supported to cam a blow wonderful kept you know the Alibaba smells like crazy but yes Alicia he's Leslie the rap master had in his pockets we're no longer his puppet they all have brothers and sisters laptops they saw they had many work possessed truck from France and the US but also on company soil that Jenna was going hard in 2015 cut the scene was the first to sing to the president we will make a fresh start Boggan was reelected half after he put in a plug yet the other half were tested so many people were killed and arrested and the hip-hop scene was identified in the marriage of a proven politics in reform is love and hateful fantone Ali Bongo and other leaders by artists but some artists will never be bored that was the news on a bit next week would be another hit funeral is like a jest Santino reporting live and erect with love and respects follow the beat son of a bitch son of a bitch son of a bitch yes further two feet one of the feet one of the beats one of the feet one of the bits yes one of the feet